Cover

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Title Page, Copyright

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pp. i-iv

Contents

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pp. v-vi

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Introduction

Richard Grusin

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pp. vii-xx

This volume marks the conclusion of an informal trilogy of books that culminates my initial five-year tenure as director of the Center for 21st Century Studies (C21) at the University of Wisconsin–Milwaukee. Like the preceding two volumes—The Nonhuman Turn and Anthropocene...

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1. Extinction Events and Entangled Humanism

William E. Connolly

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pp. 1-26

Human exceptionalism, consummate knowledge in principle, capitalist and communist mastery over nature, belonging to a beneficent world, cultural internalism, sociocentrism—all these contending world pictures demand revision today. What is wrong with them...

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2. Planetary Memories: After Extinction, the Imagined Future

Jussi Parikka

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pp. 27-50

In the Guardian-organized live chat in November 2014, the science fiction author William Gibson is asked the rather blunt question by one of the web participants, “When does the future begin?” One could easily become sarcastic at such a broad question, but Gibson refrains from...

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3. Photography after Extinction

Joanna Zylinska

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pp. 51-70

This chapter takes the horizon of extinction as a reference point against which I will think the ontology of photography and its agency. In the argument that follows, I will explore what photography can do with and to the world, what it can cast light on, and what the role of light is in approaching...

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4. The Six Extinctions: Visualizing Planetary Ecological Crisis Today

Joseph Masco

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pp. 71-106

The emerging environmental damage of the industrial age offers up rebounding visions of ecological calamity in the twenty-first century. These dangers are not new but rather have been built slowly over decades of human industry, created in the paradoxical pursuit of security, energy, and...

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5. Condors at the End of the World

Cary Wolfe

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pp. 107-122

What kind of event is extinction? To answer that question, we have to begin with an assertion that will seem paradoxical to some and commonsensical to others: that extinction is both the most natural thing in the world and, at the same time, is never and never could be natural. On...

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6. It’s Not the Anthropocene, It’s the White Supremacy Scene; or, The Geological Color Line

Nicholas Mirzoeff

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pp. 123-150

This essay is by way of a provocation and an opening to a broader discussion. It is the result of asking, What does it mean to say #BlackLivesMatter in the context of the Anthropocene? As is now common knowledge, the Anthropocene is the proposed name for a new geological era, the “recent...

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7. Lives Worth Living: Extinction, Persons, Disability

Claire Colebrook

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pp. 151-172

What is the relationship between extinction and disability? One of the ways in which we might think about disability and disability studies is as requiring an expansion of conditions of justice; this is how Martha Nussbaum has criticized the liberal tradition of fairness and personhood...

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8. Biocapitalism and De-extinction

Ashley Dawson

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pp. 173-200

A snow leopard roamed down the face of the Empire State Building. A beautiful, charismatic endangered animal, it was followed by a dazzling Kaiser’s spotted newt, a type of salamander indigenous to Iran. The animals were projected onto the side of New York City’s iconic skyscraper...

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9. Surviving the Sixth Extinction: American Indian Strategies for Life in the New World

Daryl Baldwin, Margaret Noodin, and Bernard C. Perley

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pp. 201-234

Is there life after extinction? The authors of this chapter argue yes. At first glance, the assertion that “there is life after extinction” seems trivial because some species have survived earlier mass extinctions. Humans are the beneficiaries of earlier extinctions. Yet, today, new anxieties regarding...

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Acknowledgments

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pp. 235-236

This volume, like the two preceding it, is based on one of the annual spring conferences of the Center for 21st Century Studies (C21) at the University of Wisconsin–Milwaukee (UWM). The topic of the 2015 conference (and this volume), “After Extinction,” grew out of C21’s annual...

Contributors

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pp. 237-238

Index

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pp. 239-244