Cover

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Half Title, Title Page, Copyright, Dedication

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Contents

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pp. vii-viii

List of Illustrations

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pp. ix-x

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Acknowledgments

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pp. xi-xii

I often joke, “If this professor gig doesn’t work out, I’ll open an interior design business.” From my youngest years, my primary preoccupations have been reading books and enhancing spaces. It is no surprise, then, that my first book is also preoccupied with these activities, with the many American women—both fictional and historical—who made it their ...

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Introduction: The Literature of Modern American Domesticity

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pp. 1-26

In Cimarron, Edna Ferber’s best-selling novel (1929) turned blockbuster film (1931), Sabra Cravat finds herself in Oklahoma Territory with an often-absent husband, a newspaper that needs running, and a household that needs keeping. Raised in the American South and accustomed to having servants (i.e., slaves), Sabra eventually realizes that, as her ...

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Chapter One. Delegating Domesticity: White Women Writers and the New American Housekeepers

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pp. 27-100

History shows us that Edna Ferber and Willa Cather abandoned conventional domestic roles. They did not marry, did not set up house, did not have children. But neither abandons domesticity in her writing: white characters delegate it to Indian and Mexican American characters. In early twentieth-century America, where slavery has been ...

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Chapter Two. Dialoging Domesticity: Resisting and Assimilating “The American Lady” in Early Mexican American Women’s Writing

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pp. 101-144

In others chapters I argue that Anglo-American women used their newly acquired freedom of mobility during the first decades of the twentieth century, at the height of westward expansion, to colonize Mexican American women with Anglo-American domesticity. In this chapter, I interpret writings by Mexican American women who belie the idea ...

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Chapter Three. Regulating Domesticity: Carlisle School’s Publications and Children’s Books for “American Princesses”

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pp. 145-196

We have seen how federal boarding schools and female agents of various institutions used domestic education and the tenets of domesticity inherent in the Victorian ideals of true womanhood to colonize American Indian women by systematically replacing indigenous ways of life with European American domestic habits. In this chapter, ...

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Chapter Four. Practicing Domesticity: From Domestic Outing Programs to Sovereign Domesticity

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pp. 197-254

Annie Goyitney, a Laguna Pueblo and a graduating student at the Carlisle Indian Industrial School in Pennsylvania, asks in her 1901 commencement address, “What Should Be the Aim of a Carlisle Indian Girl?” As part of the answer to her question Goyitney writes, ...

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Epilogue. Fashioning Femininity: “Types of American Girls,” “Types of Indian Girls,” and the “Wrong Kind of [Mexican] Woman”

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pp. 255-286

Mexican American and Native American women writers belie the many fictions of American domesticity. This book corroborates the work of other scholars who show that literary domesticity did not end with the nineteenth century; domesticity’s influence travels far beyond the four walls of a woman’s home; and all sentimental novelists did not laud domesticity, nor all modernist novelists scorn it. ...

Appendix: Advertisements for and Reviews of Evelyn Hunt Raymond Novels

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pp. 287-288

Notes

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pp. 289-296

Bibliography

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pp. 297-330

Index

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pp. 331-340