In this Book

summary

This work provides a compelling explanation of something that has bedeviled a number of feminist scholars: Why did popular authors like Edna Ferber continue to write conventional fiction while living lives that were far from conventional? Amanda J. Zink argues that white writers like Ferber and Willa Cather avoided the subject of their own domestic labor by writing about the performance of domestic labor by “others,” showing that American print culture, both in novels and through advertisements, moved away from portraying women as angels in the house and instead sought to persuade other women to be angels in their houses. Zink further explores lesser-known works such as Mexican American cookbooks and essays in Indian boarding school magazines to show how women writers “dialoging domesticity” exemplify the cross-cultural encounters between “colonial domesticity” and “sovereign domesticity.” By situating these interpretations of literature within their historical contexts, Zink shows how these writers championed and challenged the ideology of domesticity.

Table of Contents

  1. Cover
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  1. Half Title, Title Page, Copyright, Dedication
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  1. Contents
  2. pp. vii-viii
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  1. List of Illustrations
  2. pp. ix-x
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  1. Acknowledgments
  2. pp. xi-xii
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  1. Introduction: The Literature of Modern American Domesticity
  2. pp. 1-26
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  1. Chapter One. Delegating Domesticity: White Women Writers and the New American Housekeepers
  2. pp. 27-100
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  1. Chapter Two. Dialoging Domesticity: Resisting and Assimilating “The American Lady” in Early Mexican American Women’s Writing
  2. pp. 101-144
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  1. Chapter Three. Regulating Domesticity: Carlisle School’s Publications and Children’s Books for “American Princesses”
  2. pp. 145-196
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  1. Chapter Four. Practicing Domesticity: From Domestic Outing Programs to Sovereign Domesticity
  2. pp. 197-254
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  1. Epilogue. Fashioning Femininity: “Types of American Girls,” “Types of Indian Girls,” and the “Wrong Kind of [Mexican] Woman”
  2. pp. 255-286
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  1. Appendix: Advertisements for and Reviews of Evelyn Hunt Raymond Novels
  2. pp. 287-288
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  1. Notes
  2. pp. 289-296
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  1. Bibliography
  2. pp. 297-330
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  1. Index
  2. pp. 331-340
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Additional Information

ISBN
9780826359193
Related ISBN
9780826359186
MARC Record
OCLC
1030993310
Pages
352
Launched on MUSE
2018-04-15
Language
English
Open Access
No
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