Cover

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Half Title, Series Info, Title Page, Copyright, Dedication

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Contents

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pp. vii-viii

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Acknowledgments

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pp. ix-xii

Like any book, the inspiration for this one has a story behind it. I grew up in a medical family. One grandfather was a trauma surgeon in Las Vegas, Nevada, the other, an internist in Santa Monica, California. One grandmother and several aunts were nurses. My uncle was a cardiothoracic and transplant surgeon. ...

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Introduction

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pp. 3-21

Harold “Rusty” Billingsley started his workday like any other. October 5, 2007, was a typical fall day in Las Vegas, sunny and warm. After arriving at the CityCenter construction site, he began his job as an ironworker. CityCenter was the hottest megaresort project on the Las Vegas Strip. To replace the Boardwalk Hotel and Casino, architect ...

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Chapter 1. The Railroad

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pp. 22-64

The story of work in Las Vegas begins in 1905 with the railroad. The industry embarked on a challenging task, constructing a railway between Salt Lake City and Los Angeles. The two cities were separated by sparsely populated desert, with high temperatures, limited water, and no infrastructure, so the carrier determined that it needed to establish a railway station and yard at the halfway point. ...

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Chapter 2. The Dam

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pp. 65-119

With the exception of university-run laboratories, interest in industrial health waned during the 1920s. After the end of World War I production needs declined and unemployment rose, leading to a brief economic downturn. Playing off American fears of socialist, communist, and anarchist ideology, and of radical immigrants, the private sector partnered with the Harding, Coolidge, and Hoover administrations to repress labor ...

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Chapter 3. The Plant

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pp. 120-181

At the start of World War II American industry was considerably safer than it had been a decade earlier. Improvements in technology and the institutionalization of safety programs in most large firms helped considerably, as well as New Deal legislation. The Civil Works Administration, a short-lived job creation program that established temporary construction work during the winter of 1933-34 ...

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Chapter 4. The Test Site

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pp. 182-239

After World War II there was an unspoken truce between labor and management with regard to health and safety in the workplace. The federal government dismantled most of its wartime programs, returning to the notion that regulation disrupted the work process. Still, the conversation did not disappear completely; the Labor Management ...

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Chapter 5. The Strip

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pp. 240-302

By the late 1960s the United States could no longer ignore the crisis in occupational health. The numbers were staggering. From 1961 to 1970 the incidents of industrial accidents rose by 29 percent, with an estimated 2.2 million workers receiving injuries on the job over that period. Every year 14,500 employees died and 390,000 developed an occupational disease. ...

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Conclusion

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pp. 303-318

Roy Westerfield started his workday like any other. May 4, 1988, was a typical summer day in Henderson, Nevada—sunny and warm. At sixty-one years of age, Westerfield had late effects of polio and walked with a limp, but it did not affect his job as a comptroller for Pacific Engineering Company of Nevada (PEPCON). The company produced ...

Bibliography

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pp. 319-334

About the Author

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pp. 335-336

Index

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pp. 337-356

Image Plates

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