Cover

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Half Title, Title Page, Copyright

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Contents

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pp. v-vi

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Acknowledgments

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pp. vii-viii

I could not have completed this project without intellectual support from relatives, friends, and colleagues. Many teachers, first of all, deserve acknowledgment. During my time as a graduate student at the University of Rochester, John Michael, Ezra Tawil, Stephanie Li, Jeffrey Tucker, and the late ...

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Introduction

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pp. 1-34

In his posthumously published autobiography, the Harvard-based paleontologist, geologist, and slavery apologist Nathaniel Southgate Shaler reminiscences that one morning in the spring of 1861, he found his teacher, Louis Agassiz, weeping on Cambridge’s Divinity Avenue. One of the world’s foremost natural scientists, Agassiz was a faculty member in ...

Part I. The Black Legend, Hispanicism, and the Emergence of National Identity in the Early United States

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1. Joel Barlow’s The Vision of Columbus and The Columbiad: US National Identity and Spain

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pp. 37-63

Joel Barlow’s long Columbian poems The Vision of Columbus and the later, more doctrinaire revision The Columbiad are among the first examples of US literary nationalism. His work’s foundational role suggests meaningful questions despite the poetry’s derivative, tedious neoclassicism. At this early moment, how would Barlow conceive US nationality? ...

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2. James Fenimore Cooper’s Mercedes of Castile and Jack Tier: Realism and Hispanicism

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pp. 64-93

Scholars are generally familiar with James Fenimore Cooper’s 1840 Mercedes of Castile; or, the Voyage to Cathay, a historical novel concerning Columbus’s first voyage to the New World, via Edgar Allan Poe’s 1841 Graham’s Magazine review. In this merciless critique, Poe writes, “As a history, this work is invaluable; as a novel, it is well nigh worthless. The author deserves credit ...

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3. Herman Melville’s “Benito Cereno” as Critique of Hispanicist Exceptionalism: Cosmopolitanism and Ironizing Identity

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pp. 94-116

Readers of Herman Melville’s “Benito Cereno” who are sensitive to questions of identity and race have tended to focus on Amasa Delano’s view—funneled through free-indirect discourse—of black slaves (e.g., Karcher 1980, 109– 59; Tawil 2006, 191–208; Yellin 1970). Such studies are now supplemented by the acknowledgment that Delano’s response to Benito Cereno reflects ...

Part II. Hispanicism and the Case of Cuba

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4. Mary Peabody Mann’s Juanita: Cuba and US National Identity

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pp. 119-146

Mary Peabody Mann’s Juanita: A Romance of Real Life in Cuba Fifty Years Ago (1887) is a sentimental, of­tentimes gothic excoriation of 1830s Cuban slavery. After arriving in Cuba from her native New England, the novel’s protagonist Helen Wentworth confronts Cuba’s horrors. These terrors include the corruption her childhood friend Isabella Rodríguez experience ...

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5. José Antonio Saco’s Antiannexationist Essays: Cuba, Hispanicism, and National Identity

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pp. 147-164

In antebellum US culture, Anglo-American nationalists constructed US identity as devoted to the related ideals of cosmopolitanism and liberalism. They of­ten understood these qualities as white, US American ways of approaching the world, and they figured racial and national Others as constitutionally averse to cosmopolitanism and liberal democracy and thus as foils ...

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Epilogue: The Hispanicist Forebears of 1898

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pp. 165-186

This book primarily examines Hispanicism’s manifestations in the early national and antebellum periods. Would it have been more fitting to have wrestled more closely with 1898 and the Spanish-American War? In the late nineteenth century, US imperialists desiring control of Hispanophone nations articulated a powerful guiding ideology, challenging isolationist ...

Notes

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pp. 187-192

Works Cited

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pp. 193-206

Index

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pp. 207-212