Cover

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Title Page, Series Page, Copyright, Dedication

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pp. i-vi

Contents

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pp. vii-viii

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Preface

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pp. ix-xii

This book traces and engages critically the development of Heidegger’s nonpublic writings on “the event” between 1936 and 1942. Heidegger held these manuscripts as well as the notorious Black Notebooks (another series of nonpublic writings) hidden from the public and directed that they be published as part of...

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Acknowledgments

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pp. xiii-xiv

I would like to thank all those who inspired and helped shape this book, many of whom, I am sure, did so without my awareness. In particular, I thank Dee Mortensen and the staff of Indiana University Press as well as John Sallis for their support in making its publication possible. Perhaps the core questions of my book...

Key to Heidegger’s Gesamtausgabe (When Applicable, with English Translation)

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pp. xv-xx

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1. Introduction to Heidegger’s Poietic Writings: The Regress to the Source

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pp. 1-19

Volumes 65 to 72 of Heidegger’s collected works contain his attempt at rethinking the question of being more radically than in Being and Time.1 They were not conceived for public understanding and were written only in view of finding a language to think and speak of being in a more originary (ursprünglich) way...

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2. Contributions to Philosophy (Of the Event) (GA 65)

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pp. 20-44

This chapter is limited to an exposition of aspects and themes of Contributions that I find relevant with respect to developments and changes in Heidegger’s thinking and language in his nonpublic writings of the event between 1936 and 1942 (see my guiding questions in chapter 1) as well as with respect to my own critical...

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3. Attunement and Grounding: A Critical Engagement with Heidegger’s Contributions to Philosophy (Of the Event) (GA 65)

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pp. 45-62

I ended Chapter 2 (my expository interpretation of Heidegger’s Contributions to Philosophy) with remarks on the performative aspect of Heidegger’s thinking. I could cite many passages to highlight the sense of tension and steadfastness that characterizes Contributions, a sense of tension that has disposed my own reading...

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4. Besinnung (Mindfulness) (GA 66)

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pp. 63-91

Besinnung was written in 1938–1939, right after Contributions to Philosophy and—although it thinks within the domains of questioning opened up by Contributions—it has a distinctly different character from the earlier volume. From the appendix to Besinnung, which contains reflections by Heidegger (written in 1936–1938) on...

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5. Heidegger and History: A Critical Engagement with Heidegger’s Besinnung (GA 66), Die Geschichte des Seyns (GA 67), and the Black Notebooks

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pp. 92-103

Besinnung and Die Geschichte des Seyns stand in closer proximity to Heidegger’s Black Notebooks than the other poietic writings.1 The years 1938–1939 are indeed the years Heidegger wrote the most in his notebooks. Not only are there several references to the Black Notebooks (he referred to them as Überlegungen) in the...

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6. Über den Anfang (On Inception) (GA 70)

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pp. 104-128

With On Inception Heidegger indeed makes a new beginning (in 1941) in the thinking of the event.1 The volume (that precedes The Event) is distinctly different from Besinnung and Die Geschichte des Seyns in that the often confrontational meditations on machination and will to power (or will to will) in the earlier volumes...

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7. Hovering in Incipience: A Critical Engagement with Heidegger’s Über den Anfang (On Inception) (GA 70)

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pp. 129-139

My expository reading of On Inception in chapter 6 was already infused with some perplexity regarding Heidegger’s trajectory of thought in this volume. Where is he going? How should we understand this “downgoing into departure” and this “letting pass by” of the machinational deployment of beings; how shouldfff

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8. The Event (GA 71)

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pp. 140-166

In Contributions to Philosophy Heidegger writes that Contributions “are not yet able to join the free conjuncture of the truth of beyng out of beyng itself” (GA 65: 4; C: 6) and that the volume contains only an attempt at thinking “of” the event (GA 65: 3; C: 5). The title of GA 71, The Event, suggests that Heidegger believed...

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9. At the Brink of Language: A Critical Engagement with Heidegger’s The Event (GA 71)

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pp. 167-181

I vividly remember the day I received Das Ereignis in the mail in our cottage in Turlock, California, as I was surprised to find myself immediately reading the book (something I did not do either with Besinnung or with the other volumes following Contributions). I did not know that I had awaited the publication especially...

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Conclusion

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pp. 182-194

In my expository reading of Heidegger’s poietic writings I traced shifts in concepts, movements of thought, and attunements. Thereby a narrative emerged that (like all narratives) does not do justice to all the nuances and particularities in his writings that escape the general “storyline” of the narrative. The narrative that...

Bibliography

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pp. 195-198

Index

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pp. 199-208