In this Book

summary
In this history of the social and human sciences in Mexico and the United States, Karin Alejandra Rosemblatt reveals intricate connections among the development of science, the concept of race, and policies toward indigenous peoples. Focusing on the anthropologists, sociologists, biologists, physicians, and other experts who collaborated across borders from the Mexican Revolution through World War II, Rosemblatt traces how intellectuals on both sides of the Rio Grande forged shared networks in which they discussed indigenous peoples and other ethnic minorities. In doing so, Rosemblatt argues, they refashioned race as a scientific category and consolidated their influence within their respective national policy circles.

Postrevolutionary Mexican experts aimed to transform their country into a modern secular state with a dynamic economy, and central to this endeavor was learning how to "manage" racial difference and social welfare. The same concern animated U.S. New Deal policies toward Native Americans. The scientists' border-crossing conceptions of modernity, race, evolution, and pluralism were not simple one-way impositions or appropriations, and they had significant effects. In the United States, the resulting approaches to the management of Native American affairs later shaped policies toward immigrants and black Americans, while in Mexico, officials rejected policy prescriptions they associated with U.S. intellectual imperialism and racial segregation.

Table of Contents

  1. Cover
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  1. Title Page, Copyright, Dedication
  2. pp. i-vi
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  1. Contents
  2. pp. vii-x
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  1. Acknowledgments
  2. pp. xi-xvi
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  1. Introduction: Liberalism, Race, Nation, Modernity
  2. pp. 1-16
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  1. Part I. Science and Nation in an Age of Evolution and Eugenics, 1910–1934
  2. pp. 17-28
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  1. 1. Mexican Indigenismo and the International Fraternity of Science
  2. pp. 29-59
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  1. 2. Migration, U.S. Race Thinking, and Pan-American Anthropology
  2. pp. 60-88
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  1. Part II. Science and Nation in an Age of Modernization and Antiracist Populism, 1930–1950
  2. pp. 89-100
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  1. 3. From Cultural Pluralism to a Global Science of Acculturation in the United States
  2. pp. 101-134
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  1. 4. Cultural and Economic Evolution, Pluralism, and Categorization in Mexico
  2. pp. 135-168
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  1. Conclusion: Race, Culture, and Class
  2. pp. 169-182
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  1. Notes
  2. pp. 183-212
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  1. Bibliography
  2. pp. 213-236
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  1. Index
  2. pp. 237-255
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Additional Information

ISBN
9781469636429
Related ISBN
9781469636405
MARC Record
OCLC
1029492635
Pages
272
Launched on MUSE
2018-12-19
Language
English
Open Access
No
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