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As debates over immigration increasingly have become flashpoints of political contention in the United States, a variety of advocacy groups, social service organizations, filmmakers, and artists have provided undocumented migrants with the tools and training to document their own experiences.

In The Undocumented Everyday, Rebecca M. Schreiber examines the significance of self-representation by undocumented Mexican and Central American migrants, arguing that by centering their own subjectivity and presence through their use of documentary media, these migrants are effectively challenging intensified regimes of state surveillance and liberal strategies that emphasize visibility as a form of empowerment and inclusion. Schreiber explores documentation as both an aesthetic practice based on the visual conventions of social realism and a state-administered means of identification and control.

As Schreiber shows, by visualizing new ways of belonging not necessarily defined by citizenship, these migrants are remaking documentary media, combining formal visual strategies with those of amateur photography and performative elements to create a mixed-genre aesthetic. In doing so, they make political claims and create new forms of protection for migrant communities experiencing increased surveillance, detention, and deportation.

Table of Contents

  1. Cover
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  1. Title Page, Copyright
  2. pp. i-iv
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  1. Contents
  2. pp. v-vi
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  1. Acronyms
  2. pp. vii-viii
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  1. Preface
  2. pp. ix-xvi
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  1. Introduction: Migrant Lives and the Promise of Documentation
  2. pp. 1-38
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  1. Part I. Ordinary Identifications and Unseen America
  1. 1. “We See What We Know”: Migrant Labor and the Place of Pictures
  2. pp. 41-78
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  1. 2. The Border’s Frame: Between Poughkeepsie and La Ciénega
  2. pp. 79-116
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  1. Part II. Documentary, Self-Representation, and “Collaborations” in the U.S.– Mexico Borderlands
  1. 3. Visible Frictions: The Border Film Project and the “Spectacle of Surveillance”
  2. pp. 119-158
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  1. 4. Refusing Disposability: Representational Strategies in Maquilápolis: City of Factories
  2. pp. 159-192
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  1. Part III. Counter-Optics: Disruptions in the Field of the Visible
  1. 5. Disappearance and Counter-Spectacle in Sanctuary City/Ciudad Santuario, 1989–2009
  2. pp. 195-232
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  1. 6. Reconfiguring Documentation: Mobility, Counter-Visibility, and (Un)Documented Activism
  2. pp. 233-270
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  1. Conclusion: Counter-Representational Acts
  2. pp. 271-276
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  1. Acknowledgments
  2. pp. 277-282
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  1. Notes
  2. pp. 283-352
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  1. Index
  2. pp. 353-372
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Additional Information

ISBN
9781452956398
Related ISBN
9781517900236
MARC Record
OCLC
1028023283
Pages
360
Launched on MUSE
2018-03-11
Language
English
Open Access
No
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