In this Book

summary

In Repentance for the Holocaust, C. K. Martin Chung develops the biblical idea of "turning" (tshuvah) into a conceptual framework to analyze a particular area of contemporary German history, commonly referred to as Vergangenheitsbewältigung or "coming to terms with the past." Chung examines a selection of German responses to the Nazi past, their interaction with the victims’ responses, such as those from Jewish individuals, and their correspondence with biblical repentance. In demonstrating the victims’ influence on German responses, Chung asserts that the phenomenon of Vergangenheitsbewältigung can best be understood in a relational, rather than a national, paradigm.

By establishing the conformity between those responses to past atrocities and the idea of "turning," Chung argues that the religious texts from the Old Testament encapsulating this idea (especially the Psalms of Repentance) are viable intellectual resources for dialogues among victims, perpetrators, bystanders, and their descendants in the discussion of guilt and responsibility, justice and reparation, remembrance and reconciliation. It is a great irony that after Nazi Germany sought to eliminate each and every single Jew within its reach, postwar Germans have depended on the Jewish device of repentance as a feasible way out of their unparalleled national catastrophe and unprecedented spiritual ruin.

In Repentance for the Holocaust, C. K. Martin Chung develops the biblical idea of "turning" (tshuvah) into a conceptual framework to analyze a particular area of contemporary German history, commonly referred to as Vergangenheitsbewältigung or "coming to terms with the past." Chung examines a selection of German responses to the Nazi past, their interaction with the victims' responses, such as those from Jewish individuals, and their correspondence with biblical repentance. In demonstrating the victims’ influence on German responses, Chung asserts that the phenomenon of Vergangenheitsbewältigung can best be understood in a relational, rather than a national, paradigm.By establishing the conformity between those responses to past atrocities and the idea of "turning," Chung argues that the religious texts from the Old Testament encapsulating this idea (especially the Psalms of Repentance) are viable intellectual resources for dialogues among victims, perpetrators, bystanders, and their descendants in the discussion of guilt and responsibility, justice and reparation, remembrance and reconciliation. It is a great irony that after Nazi Germany sought to eliminate each and every single Jew within its reach, postwar Germans have depended on the Jewish device of repentance as a feasible way out of their unparalleled national catastrophe and unprecedented spiritual ruin.

Table of Contents

  1. Cover
  2. open access
    • Download PDF Download
    contents
  1. Title Page, Copyright Page
  2. pp. i-viii
  3. open access
    • Download PDF Download
    contents
  1. Contents
  2. pp. ix-x
  3. open access
    • Download PDF Download
    contents
  1. Acknowledgments
  2. pp. xi-xii
  3. open access
    • Download PDF Download
    contents
  1. List of Abbreviations
  2. pp. xiii-xvi
  3. open access
    • Download PDF Download
    contents
  1. Introduction: The German Problem of Vergangenheitsbewältigung
  2. pp. 1-20
  3. open access
    • Download PDF Download
    contents
  1. Part I The Jewish Device of Repentance: From Individual, Divine-Human to Interhuman, Collective “Turning”
  2. pp. 21-24
  3. open access
    • Download PDF Download
    contents
  1. 1. “Turning” in the God-Human Relationship (R1–R9)
  2. pp. 25-51
  3. open access
    • Download PDF Download
    contents
  1. 2. Interhuman and Collective Repentance (R10–R14)
  2. pp. 52-80
  3. open access
    • Download PDF Download
    contents
  1. Part II Mutual-Turning in German Vergangenheitsbewältigung: Responses and Correspondence
  2. pp. 81-82
  3. open access
    • Download PDF Download
    contents
  1. 3. “People, Not Devils” (P1)
  2. pp. 83-91
  3. open access
    • Download PDF Download
    contents
  1. 4. “Fascism Was the Great Apostasy” (P2)
  2. pp. 92-101
  3. open access
    • Download PDF Download
    contents
  1. 5. “The French Must Love the German Spirit Now Entrusted to Them” (P3)
  2. pp. 102-115
  3. open access
    • Download PDF Download
    contents
  1. 6. “One Cannot Speak of Injustice without Raising the Question of Guilt” (P4)
  2. pp. 116-128
  3. open access
    • Download PDF Download
    contents
  1. 7. “You Won’t Believe How Thankful I Am for What You Have Said” (P5)
  2. pp. 129-139
  3. open access
    • Download PDF Download
    contents
  1. 8. “Courage to Say No and Still More Courage to Say Yes” (P6)
  2. pp. 140-156
  3. open access
    • Download PDF Download
    contents
  1. 9. “Raise Our Voice, Both Jews and Germans” (P7)
  2. pp. 157-167
  3. open access
    • Download PDF Download
    contents
  1. 10. “The Appropriateness of Each Proposition Depends upon Who Utters It” (P8)
  2. pp. 168-183
  3. open access
    • Download PDF Download
    contents
  1. 11. “Hitler Is in Ourselves, Too” (P9)
  2. pp. 184-199
  3. open access
    • Download PDF Download
    contents
  1. 12. “I Am Germany” (P10)
  2. pp. 200-216
  3. open access
    • Download PDF Download
    contents
  1. 13. “Know before Whom You Will Have to Give an Account” (P11)
  2. pp. 217-234
  3. open access
    • Download PDF Download
    contents
  1. 14. “We Take Over the Guilt of the Fathers” (P12)
  2. pp. 235-261
  3. open access
    • Download PDF Download
    contents
  1. 15. “Remember the Evil, but Do Not Forget the Good” (P13)
  2. pp. 262-289
  3. open access
    • Download PDF Download
    contents
  1. 16. “We Are Not Authorized to Forgive” (P14)
  2. pp. 290-317
  3. open access
    • Download PDF Download
    contents
  1. Conclusion
  2. pp. 318-328
  3. open access
    • Download PDF Download
    contents
  1. Bibliography
  2. pp. 329-348
  3. open access
    • Download PDF Download
    contents
  1. Index
  2. pp. 349-360
  3. open access
    • Download PDF Download
    contents

Additional Information

ISBN
9781501712524
Related ISBN(s)
9781501707612, 9781501707629, 9781501712531
MARC Record
OCLC
1080549285
Pages
376
Launched on MUSE
2019-01-02
Language
English
Open Access
Yes

Copyright

Back To Top

This website uses cookies to ensure you get the best experience on our website. Without cookies your experience may not be seamless.