Cover

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Title Page, Copyright

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pp. i-v

Contents

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pp. vi-x

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Introduction

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pp. 1-5

In the year before his death at the age of ninetytwo, Bill Friday sat down with me twice for interviews for this book. Because of his long and legendary career with the University of North Carolina system, Friday knew and worked with almost all of the Daily Tar Heel (DTH) editors and many other staff members over a remarkable five decades—almost half the paper’s life—from the time he became Dean of Men at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill (UNC) in 1948, through his tenure as system...

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1. OFFICIAL ORGAN OF THE ATHLETIC ASSOCIATION, 1893–1923

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pp. 6-53

At first glance, the campus of the University of North Carolina in the early months of 1893 seemed an unlikely place for the birth of a newspaper. Especially one that would become an important voice for the school throughout the twentieth century and well into the twenty-first, and would help launch the careers of dozens of noted journalists and graduates in a wide range of professions. Despite the fact that the university was to celebrate its centennial that October—the 100th anniversary of the laying of the...

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2. CRACK-BRAINED PROFESSORS AND BABY RADICALS, 1923–1941

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pp. 54-104

As the University of North Carolina rapidly expanded and modernized during the 1920s and 1930s, so did the Tar Heel. Over the short span of just nine years the paper matured and professionalized: in 1923 it became an official university publication supported by student fees with an editor elected annually by the entire student body; in 1929 it became a daily (published every day except Monday); and in 1932 an official stylebook, based on those employed at several of the nation’s top newspapers, was published for internal use. In addition the paper’s staff actively...

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3. THE TRUTH IN EIGHT-POINT TYPE, 1941–1959

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pp. 105-163

The American home front during World War II, including the UNC campus, is often remembered romantically as a place of abundant patriotism and a spirit of pulling together for the common national cause. While that was certainly true, it was also a period of great anxiety and uncertainty, and concern about the long-term effects the war would have on the university. It was a particularly difficult time for the student newspaper, which struggled with shortages of staff, money, and supplies. In addition, as the U.S....

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4. PRINT NEWS AND RAISE HELL, 1959–1971

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pp. 164-231

As the Daily Tar Heel approached its seventy-fifth anniversary, it had become a sophisticated newspaper with makeup and layout on the order of the best big-city dailies of the era and an informed and generally progressive editorial page read across the state and beyond. Generations of editors and staff had worked to build such a paper, first in the 1920s and 1930s, and then again after the disruption of World War II. The student caretakers of the 1960s understood the established legacy of professional journalistic standards and freedom of speech that formed...

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5. A FREE PRESS MUST PREVAIL, 1971–1993

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pp. 232-290

Despite the defeat of the 1970 campus-wide referendum and the 1971 bill in the state legislature, both designed to end the use of student fees to partially underwrite the Daily Tar Heel, the battle over defunding became even more intense during the years that followed, consuming large amounts of the paper’s resources and staff time. Although the wheels that Jesse Helms and conservative students set in motion in 1969 would, in fact, eventually lead to the paper’s separation from university funding and oversight, the...

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EPILOGUE: SERVING UNC STUDENTS AND THE UNIVERSITY COMMUNITY SINCE 1893

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pp. 291-306

At the time the Daily Tar Heel became independent of student-fee funding in 1993, no one could have anticipated the challenges that lay ahead in the new millennium. The quarter century between the paper’s 100th anniversary and its 125th witnessed the coming of the digital information age, and virtually all aspects of traditional print journalism were upended, almost to the point of extinction. Simply put, the way news is gathered and delivered, and the way people access and interact with it, has been revolutionized....

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Acknowledgments

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pp. 307-310

This book was a very complicated project on many levels, and I am indebted to several dozen people who assisted its progress along the way. The project began in April 2011, when the book was commissioned by DTH Media. The manuscript was completed in October 2013, but did not arrive at UNC Press for another three years. In a somewhat bizarre plot twist, the book became entangled in the financial and administrative struggles at DTH Media, written about briefly in the epilogue. I am deeply grateful to all of those who worked to see this published, and who...

Photo Credits

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pp. 311-312

Notes

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pp. 313-334

Index

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pp. 335-350