In this Book

  • Footprints of Hopi History: Hopihiniwtiput Kukveni'at
  • Edited by Leigh J. Kuwanwisiwma, T. J. Ferguson, and Chip Colwell
  • 2018
  • Book
  • Published by: University of Arizona Press
    • View
    • View Citation
    contents
summary
Kukveni—footprints—are a powerful historical metaphor that the Hopi people use to comprehend their tangible heritage. Hopis say that the deity Máasaw instructed their ancestors to leave footprints during their migrations from their origin place to their home today as evidence that they had fulfilled a spiritual pact to serve as stewards of his land. Today’s Hopis understand these footprints to be the archaeological remains of former settlements—pottery sherds, stone tools, petroglyphs, and other physical evidence of past use and occupation of the land.

The fourteen chapters in Footprints of Hopi History: Hopihiniwtiput Kukveni’at focus on these Hopi footprints as they are understood through a variety of research techniques, including archaeology, ethnography, documentary history, plant genetics, and educational outreach. The editors and contributors offer fresh and innovative perspectives on Hopi archaeology and history, and demonstrate how one tribe has significantly advanced knowledge about its past through collaboration with archaeologists and cultural anthropologists.

The book features managerial uses of research, cultural landscape theory, use of GIS in research, archaeological interpretations of social identity and immigration, analysis of corn genetics, heritage education of youth, and research of oral traditions and documentary history. Footprints of Hopi History highlights the Hopi tribe’s leadership in sustained efforts to create bridges between tribal goals and anthropology, forging a path for others to follow.


Contributors

E. Charles Adams
Wesley Bernardini
Joëlle Clark
Chip Colwell
T. J. Ferguson
Dennis Gilpin
Kelley Hays-Gilpin
George Gumerman IV
Saul L. Hedquist
Maren P. Hopkins
Stewart B. Koyiyumptewa
Leigh J. Kuwanwisiwma
Lee Wayne Lomayestewa
Patrick D. Lyons
Shirley Powell
Gregson Schachner
Thomas E. Sheridan
Mark D. Varien
Laurie D. Webster
Peter M. Whiteley
Michael Yeatts

Table of Contents

  1. Cover
  2. open access
    • Download PDF Download
    contents
  1. Title Page, Copyright, Dedication
  2. pp. i-vi
  3. open access
    • Download PDF Download
    contents
  1. Contents
  2. pp. vii-viii
  3. open access
    • Download PDF Download
    contents
  1. Preface
  2. T.J. Ferguson and Chip Colwell
  3. pp. 9-16
  4. open access
    • Download PDF Download
    contents
  1. 1. The Collaborative Road: A Personal History of the Hopi Cultural Preservation Office
  2. Leigh J. Kuwanwisiwma
  3. pp. 17-29
  4. open access
    • Download PDF Download
    contents
  1. 2. Traditional Cultural Properties and the Hopi Model of Cultural Preservation
  2. Chip Colwell and Stewart B. Koyiyumptewa
  3. pp. 30-52
  4. open access
    • Download PDF Download
    contents
  1. 3. Maintaining Hopi Stewardship of Öngtupqa (the Grand Canyon)
  2. Michael Yeatts
  3. pp. 53-65
  4. open access
    • Download PDF Download
    contents
  1. 4. Tungwniwpi nit Wukwlavayi (Named Places and Oral Traditions): Multivocal Approaches to Hopi Land
  2. Saul L. Hedquist et al.
  3. pp. 66-86
  4. open access
    • Download PDF Download
    contents
  1. 5. Visual Prominence and the Stability of Cultural Landscapes
  2. Wesley Bernardini
  3. pp. 87-103
  4. open access
    • Download PDF Download
    contents
  1. 6. The Homol’ovi Research Program: Enriching Hopi History Through Collaboration
  2. E. Charles Adams
  3. pp. 104-117
  4. open access
    • Download PDF Download
    contents
  1. 7. The Davis Ranch Site: A Kayenta Immigrant Enclave and a Hopi Footprint in Southeastern Arizona
  2. Patrick D. Lyons
  3. pp. 118-136
  4. open access
    • Download PDF Download
    contents
  1. 8. Becoming Hopi: Exploring Hopi Ethnogenesis Through Architecture, Pottery, and Cultural Knowledge
  2. Kelley Hays­Gilpin and Dennis Gilpin
  3. pp. 137-154
  4. open access
    • Download PDF Download
    contents
  1. 9. Pathways to Hopi: Cultural Affiliation and the Archaeological Textile Record
  2. Laurie D. Webster
  3. pp. 155-170
  4. open access
    • Download PDF Download
    contents
  1. 10. The Genetic Diversity of Hopi Corn
  2. Mark D. Varien et al.
  3. pp. 171-191
  4. open access
    • Download PDF Download
    contents
  1. 11. Hopi Footprints: What Really Matters in Cultural Preservation
  2. Joëlle Clark and George Gumerman IV
  3. pp. 192-211
  4. open access
    • Download PDF Download
    contents
  1. 12. Oral Traditions and the Tyranny of the Documentary Record: The Moquis and Kastiilam Hopi History Project
  2. Thomas E. Sheridan
  3. pp. 212-227
  4. open access
    • Download PDF Download
    contents
  1. 13. Forging New Intellectual Genealogies in Southwest Archaeology
  2. Gregson Schachner
  3. pp. 228-243
  4. open access
    • Download PDF Download
    contents
  1. 14. The Native Shaping of Anthropological Inquiry
  2. Peter M. Whiteley
  3. pp. 244-260
  4. open access
    • Download PDF Download
    contents
  1. Appendix: Primary Research Reports and Publications from Projects Sponsored by the Hopi Cultural Preservation Office
  2. pp. 261-274
  3. open access
    • Download PDF Download
    contents
  1. Contributors
  2. pp. 275-280
  3. open access
    • Download PDF Download
    contents
  1. Index
  2. pp. 281-288
  3. open access
    • Download PDF Download
    contents

Additional Information

ISBN
9780816538379
Related ISBN(s)
9780816536986, 9780816540976
MARC Record
OCLC
1020580397
Pages
288
Launched on MUSE
2018-01-30
Language
English
Open Access
Yes
Back To Top

This website uses cookies to ensure you get the best experience on our website. Without cookies your experience may not be seamless.