Cover

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Title Page, Copyright, Dedication, Epigram

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Contents

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pp. ix-x

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Foreword

Charles R. Thomas Jr.

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pp. xi-xii

Every faculty member of color, at one time or another, must try to reconcile experiences of racism with dominant cultural claims of equal opportunity, professionalism, and merit while serving in the academy. A key to surviving challenges and learning how to exploit opportunities in academic medicine and other health professions is to have a framework to navigate the terrain. ...

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Acknowledgments

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pp. xiii-xiv

I am deeply grateful for the contributions my friends and colleagues, Drs. Ann Beckett and Kristin Lutz, made to the study presented in this book. Ann and I began working together on studies of racism in nursing education sixteen years ago. She is a talented interviewer and a committed friend. Kristin, a grounded theory expert, joined our team for this study and lent valuable methodological expertise. ...

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Introduction

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pp. 1-19

More than ten years ago the Sullivan Commission on Diversity in the Health Care Workforce found that access to a health career was “largely separate and unequal” (3) p.iv. Despite this warning, underrepresentation of people of color in the health professions continues to be severe. This lack of racial and ethnic diversity has crippled the nation’s ability to address the disproportionately high rates of morbidity ...

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1 | Swimming Upstream: Exclusion and Control of Faculty of Color

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pp. 20-55

Dr. Christian Head, a black surgeon and faculty member at the UCLA School of Medicine, was subjected to ongoing racism, including threats and harassment by administrators, faculty, and residents within his department. Despite his reporting this behavior and seeking assistance from university channels, the racist behavior continued unabated. ...

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2 | Institutional Climate

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pp. 56-112

Climate includes features of the institutional environment that are most easily observed, such as leadership composition, communication patterns, and organizational structure. Culture, which gives birth to institutional climate, includes more unstructured features of the environment, such as values and beliefs (211). In an analysis of a nationally representative sample of 29,169 faculty, ...

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3 | Mentors and Leaders: Keys to Change

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pp. 113-143

Strong mentorship and institutional leaders committed to the development, advancement, and protection of faculty of color were the two most important factors underlying the satisfaction and success of participants in the study. In this chapter I describe participants’ common experiences with mentorship from the mentee perspective. ...

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4 | Strategies for Thriving in Health Professions Academe

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pp. 144-173

People enter academia hoping for long and satisfying careers. Yet many faculty experience burnout, and some leave academia altogether. Why do some faculty do well and others poorly? How might this phenomenon be qualitatively different for faculty of color? Participants’ stories reflect different levels of satisfaction and success, providing some answers to these questions. ...

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5 | Working toward Equity

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pp. 174-196

Although faculty of all races and ethnicities have contributed to efforts to achieve equity, faculty of color bear a disproportionate burden of this work. The term “minority tax” has been coined to describe these extra responsibilities (333). Although this work often has great meaning for faculty of color, it leaves far less time to produce what is most valued by academic institutions for promotion: ...

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6 | Group Differences

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pp. 197-242

Whiteness is a set of unearned privileges disguised behind structures of silence, obfuscation, and denial in Western societies (369). Because people of color in the United States live outside the boundaries of whiteness, they have many experiences in common. For example, rejection of Donald Trump’s candidacy for president ...

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Conclusion | Voices of Change: Lessons Learned from the Experiences of Faculty of Color in the Health Professions

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pp. 243-252

Health professions education has a moral obligation to serve the nation’s health based on the assumption that all human lives, regardless of social background, are of equal value. Most health professions’ ethical codes, although largely focused on the care of individuals, also recognize the importance of working to ensure just health outcomes (437–444). ...

References

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pp. 253-286

Index

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pp. 287-294