Cover

pdf iconDownload PDF
 

Title Page, Copyright Page

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. i-viii

Contents

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. ix-x

read more

Acknowledgments

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. xi-xiv

The material in this volume was originally intended to be combined with—in fact, published together with—the material from New Italian Migrations to the United States, Volume 1: Politics and History since 1945. The complexities of academic publishing ultimately separated the material into two distinct but interconnected volumes divided by disciplinary concerns. That the University of Illinois Press recognized the importance of this topic for not one but two volumes released within months of each other illustrates the degree of scholarly lacuna on the subject. We are grateful to all those at the press...

read more

Introduction: Rebooting Italian America /

Laura E. Ruberto and Joseph Sciorra

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 1-31

Early in Mario Puzo’s The Godfather, the baker Nazorine visits Vito Corleone in the Don’s office to ask for a favor. It is August 1945, and World War II has been over in Europe since May. In this scene, part of an iconic sequence from the Francis Ford Coppola film adaptation, Nazorine recounts his daughter’s relationship with an Italian prisoner of war, Enzo Aguello, held in the United States. The two have fallen in love, Nazorine tells the Don, and now that the war is over the Italian soldier will be repatriated. Nazorine wants him to stay...

read more

1. “Don’t Forget You Have Relatives Here”: Transnational Intimacy and Acoustic Communities of WOV-AM's La Grande Famiglia

Joseph Sciorra

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 32-64

In 1955, my paternal grandmother Filomena sent a message from Carunchio, an Abruzzese town in the Apennines, to her only son, Enrico, and his wife, Anna, in Manhattan’s Washington Heights neighborhood. My father had left Italy three years earlier in search of work and in New York City met his future bride, who had also sailed across the Atlantic in 1950. Enrico and Anna married in 1954 and had me, their first child, the following year. In her message delivered in standard Italian, my grandmother rebuked the young couple, who with their new responsibilities were not making the time to...

read more

2. “Hot-Blooded Eye-­talian” Women: The Lascivious and Desperate Post–World War II Italian Immigrant in U. S. Cinema

Laura E. Ruberto

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 65-92

Near the end of Giuseppe De Santis’s 1949 Riso amaro (Bitter Rice), the film’s hero Marco proclaims his desire to start a new life together with Francesca by emigrating together to Argentina. Marco calls Argentina a “paese vergine” (virgin country), distinguishing it from the United States, a place he considers corrupt, led by a consumerist culture. The film’s passing references to post–World War II Italian emigration recognize that the future of Italy in the second half of the twentieth century is rooted to some extent in the communities and cultures of Italy’s many diasporas....

read more

3. A Moralizing Landscape as Scenography: Silvio Barile’s “Italian American Historical Artistic Museum"

John Allan Cicala

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 93-116

One summer evening in 1975, baker Silvio Barile was repairing the cracks in his driveway next to his home in Redford Township near Detroit. As he was pouring and smoothing out the cement, he reflected on how similar the mortar was to the dough that he kneaded for his bakery products. “The thought came to me if I could make different types of bread and pizza, then I could create little things with concrete” (interview, May 28, 1994).1 Inspired, he started constructing replicas of Greco-Roman mythical and historical figures like Aeneas, Lavinia, Constantine, and Caesar Augustus. His...

read more

4. Performing in the Italian American “Translation Zone” : Alessandra Belloni’s Tarantella

Incoronata (Nadia) Inserra

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 117-138

This essay explores the post–World War II Italian migration experience in the United States through the life and work of Italian-born artist Alessandra Belloni, an influential figure on world music stages in the United States and abroad since the 1970s. In discussing the role of Belloni in relation to post–World War II Italian migration, I ask not only what aspects of Italian culture the artist brought with her to the United States as a non–workingclass immigrant—particularly her expertise in southern Italian folk music and dance—but also what image(s) of Italy Belloni projects through both...

read more

5. Immigrant Tastemakers: Italian Cookbook Writers and the Transnational Formation of Taste in Postindustrial America (1973 - 2000)

Simone Cinotto

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 139-166

A rich condiment with roots in the Middle Ages, balsamic vinegar (aceto balsamico) has been made through a time-expensive technique in a small area of production around Modena, in the Emilia-Romagna region. Until the early 1970s, balsamic vinegar was virtually unknown in the rest of Italy. It was not even a commodity, being parsimoniously used by local families for self-consumption, when the Modena-based Fini food company in the mid-1970s made the decision to sell a stock of the precious liquid they had acquired. As part of its launch, Fini gave a sample of the product to...

read more

6. Migration Italian Style: Charting the Contemporary U.S.–Bound Exodus (1990–2013)

Teresa Fiore

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 167-192

A 2012 FIAT commercial, which introduced three 500 models to the U.S. market while implicitly hinting at the FIAT takeover of Chrysler, starts on the Amalfi coast, an Italian spot par excellence for the American audience. Several 500s are driving along winding roads, pretty beaches, and quaint docks while Italian singer Arianna croons “Sexy People,” a propulsive song that interpolates Ernesto De Curtis’s 1902 evergreen “Torna a Surriento.” A classic of the Neapolitan repertoire in the Italian diaspora, and particularly in the United States, where the song was interpreted by the likes of Frank...

read more

Afterword: Rethinking Labels: The “Italian” Writer as Exemplar, or Distinct Categories as Quixotic

Anthony Julian Tamburri

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 193-202

Laura E. Ruberto and Joseph Sciorra have put together an exemplary collection of essays that deal with an area of Italian American studies that has gone virtually ignored by the majority of voices dedicated to intellectual interrogations: emigration from Italy to the United States from 1945 to the present day. Their coauthored introduction and the contributors’ essays provide a foundation for further investigation of this immigration flow and its historical and aesthetic contextualization. One of the significant aspects of this collection is that the scholars herein have underscored the...

Contributors

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 203-206

Index

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 207-214