Cover

pdf iconDownload PDF
 

Title Page, Copyright

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. i-iv

Contents

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. v-vi

read more

Acknowledgments

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. vii-viii

I gratefully acknowledge the support of the National Endowment for the Humanities, Florida State University, Indiana University–Purdue University Indianapolis, and the Virtual Center for Spatial Humanities. Thanks to Molly Reed for assistance organizing gatherings of the Working Group on Religion and Space in...

read more

Introduction

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 1-22

At a banquet in ancient Thessaly, the Greek poet Simonides of Ceos (556–468 b.c.) chanted a lyric to a roomful of celebrants during a dinner convened to honor their host, Scopas. According to Greek storytellers, when Simonides stepped outside a short time later, the roof of the house collapsed, all were killed...

Part One: Maps

read more

A Sea of Texts: The Atlantic World, Spatial Mapping, and Equiano’s Narrative

Elizabeth Maddock Dillon

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 25-54

The “Atlantic World” is a spatial concept. Literally, the “Atlantic” is an ocean, and in recent years, historians and literary scholars have increasingly called upon this ocean to define the field of study in which they work. Scholars who might once have worked in the areas of early American literature or British...

read more

Clerics, Cartographers, and Kings: Mapping Power in the French Atlantic World, 1608–1752

George Edward Milne

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 55-75

In the spring of 1726, a Jesuit missionary and his escorts paddled up the Mississippi on their way to the Arkansas Post, a tiny settlement on the banks of the river. In the description of his voyage, the priest wrote, “I am not yet sufficiently acquainted with the Country and with the customs of the Savages to give you...

read more

Mapping Urban Religion in an Atlantic Port

Kyle B. Roberts

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 76-94

Upon first glance, the intersection of Ann and Nassau Streets in lower Manhattan, as reproduced in an 1830 issue of the New-York Mirror, looks like a typical early-nineteenth-century city block. In a view that could just as easily be seen in Dublin, Bristol, New Orleans, or a number of other Atlantic seaports, the...

Part Two: Distance

read more

Missionary Time and Space: The Atlantic World in the Early Modern Age

Luca Codignola

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 97-115

As all runners and mountaineers well know, distances run during daily sessions of training, accounting for any sort of slope and altitude variation, can now be calculated with extreme precision through a quick look at one’s wrist computer. The only truly subjective element that remains is one’s level of fitness...

read more

Religious Community and Cross-Religious Communication beyond the Atlantic World: The Lost Tribes in the Americas and Mecca

Brandon Marriott

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 116-132

In 1650 the Presbyterian minister Thomas Thorowgood published a treatise in London that claimed the indigenous peoples of the Americas were descendants of the Lost Tribes of Israel. Alongside references to scholarly writings and the New England missionary activities of the Puritan John Eliot, Thorowgood...

read more

The Religious Spaces of American Whaling

Richard J. Callahan, Jr.

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 133-152

The ship Morrison, under the command of Captain Samuel Green, Jr., set out from New London, Connecticut, on September 16, 1844, bound for the North Pacific on a whaling voyage. The ship headed east across the Atlantic, planning to round the southern tip of Africa into the Indian Ocean and the...

Part Three: Design

read more

Spatial Hegemony and Evangelization: A Network-Based View of an Early Franciscan Doctrinal Settlement in Highland Peru

Steven A. Wernke and Lauren E. Kohut

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 155-179

How were the spaces of early Catholic evangelization in the Andean region organized? By what manipulations of the built environment were new rhythms of daily life and religious practice among the former subjects of the Inka to be inculcated? Such questions are as important as they have been obscure. In...

read more

Stone Walls Do Not a Prison Make: French America’s Cosmopolitan Cloisters

Jan Noel

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 180-200

Sister Juchereau Saint-Ignace, daughter of a prominent bourgeois family, sat down and recorded an improbable incident in the annals of her convent, the Québec Hôtel-Dieu, in 1703. English forces attacking the port of Cadiz had deliberately dragged an image of the blessed Virgin through the mud in the filthiest...

read more

Configuring and Reconfiguring Cathedral Space in the Spanish Atlantic: From Cathedral-Mosque to Baroque Machine

Sing D’Arcy

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 201-226

When in the early 1520s Luis de Moya and his team began the construction of the Cathedral of Santa María de la Encarnación in Santo Domingo, the architectural links that would unite the American and European shores of the Atlantic were cemented into place. This act of spiritual and temporal confidence...

Part Four: Identities

read more

Emigration, Transatlantic Communication, and Methodist Identity in Nineteenth-Century Ontario and Québec

Todd Webb

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 229-245

On March 20, 1855, readers of the Watchman, one of the leading newspapers of the Wesleyan Methodist Church in Britain, had the chance to peruse a report from “Theophilus,” identified as “our correspondent” in the British North American colonies of Lower and Upper Canada—present-day Québec and...

read more

Confessional Spaces and Religious Places: Lutherans in America, 1698–1748

Elizabeth Lewis Pardoe

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 246-266

European confessionalization culminated in the 1648 Treaty of Westphalia, which codified the premise that geographical space required uniformity of political and religious practice to achieve peace. Although Puritan New England enforced uniformity, Dutch New York, Swedish Delaware, and Quaker Pennsylvania...

read more

Confessional Spatiality in the Puritan Atlantic

Heather Miyano Kopelson

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 267-284

In some ways the puritan minister Michael Wigglesworth is an obvious starting place for a spatially inclined investigation of religion and the Atlantic World.1 He is familiar to many students of early American religion, literature, and history as the author of The Day of Doom, a verse meditation on Judgment Day, which...

Notes

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 285-360

read more

Contributors

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 361-364

RICHARD J. CALLAHAN, JR., is associate professor of religious studies at the University of Missouri. He received his Ph.D. at the University of California, Santa Barbara, and is the author of Work and Faith in the Kentucky Coal Fields and editor of New Territories, New Perspectives: The Religious Impact of the Louisiana...

Index

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 365-368