Cover

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Title Page, Series Page, Copyright

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pp. i-iv

Contents

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pp. v-vi

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Acknowledgments

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pp. vii-viii

This book and the research that has contributed to it are in part the fruit of my collaboration with and learning from many knowledgeable individuals as well as of generous assistance from several institutions. I would like first to thank Antony Polonsky for his constant academic and personal...

Abbreviations

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pp. ix-xii

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Introduction: In Search of Postwar Memory

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pp. 1-16

On the sunny Saturday morning of July 14, 1945, Chaim Wittelsohn entered the damp room of the local Centralna Żydowska Komisja Historyczna (CŻKH, Central Jewish Historical Commission) in Sosnowiec, a town in the Upper Silesian industrial region of Poland, about forty miles...

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1. The Returning Survivors: Historical Context

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pp. 17-40

By the end of the Second World War, Poland and the Poles had been, according to any objective political or social assessment, simply ruined. In a deal sealed at Yalta in February 1945, the supposedly “friendly” transfer of the eastern regions of Poland to Stalin in exchange for a strip of land...

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2. The Central Jewish Historical Commission and Its Project of Documenting Survivors’ Stories

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pp. 41-64

As Jewish historians in occupied Poland became aware of the uniqueness of the catastrophe they were facing, they attempted to record it, either in individual efforts or in war-defying collective initiatives. This work did not stop once the war was over. Realizing the scope of the near-total...

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3. First Encounters with the Neighbors as Represented in the Jewish Historical Institute Collection

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pp. 65-85

The early survivors’ testimonies collected by the Jewish Historical Commission (later the Jewish Historical Institute) focused on that brief moment of transition between the return of the Jews and their decision to remain in Poland or to leave it. These collected accounts, therefore, may provide...

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4. Yad Vashem Testimonies in the Context of Israeli History

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pp. 86-111

Those Holocaust survivors who left Poland in order to settle in Eretz Israel, the Land of Israel, soon found themselves in the unprecedented circumstances of becoming citizens of a novel Jewish state. In contrast to a diasporic existence, in which statehood and nationality were disconnected...

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5. Memories of the First Encounters as Represented in the Yad Vashem Collection

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pp. 112-129

The Yad Vashem archives include the amplest collection of Holocaust testimonies in the world. The earliest accounts, dating from the 1950s and 1960s, were the first deposited by the new survivor-residents of Israel. Although YV collections have been extensively investigated within the...

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6. Comparative Analysis of the Data: Memory on a Curve

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pp. 130-194

The analysis of selected sources from the collections of the Jewish Historical Institute and Yad Vashem with respect to Holocaust survivors’ memories of their postwar reception by the Polish population seems to confirm an initial suspicion that the survivors would be more likely to speak of...

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Conclusions: Toward Building a Collective Memory

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pp. 195-202

The close reading of the survivors’ testimonies from Poland and Israel on these pages reveals several relationships between the recorded memories of their postwar encounters with Polish Gentiles and the place and time of their recalling of those memories. The development of the memory of...

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Appendix: On the Valueof Quantitative Analysis

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pp. 203-206

Apart from qualitative analysis, my study also contains a limited amount of quantitative research on a sample of sources that I preselected based on indications that they were likely to contain information about postwar Polish–Jewish encounters. By computing these data, I attempt to provide a framework for...

Notes

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pp. 207-226

Bibliography

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pp. 227-248

Index

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pp. 249-253

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About the Author

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p. 254

Monika Rice teaches courses on the Holocaust, Jewish–Christian relations, and women’s spirituality at Seton Hall University and Gratz College. She has received a number of prestigious fellowships and grants and has published articles, essays, and reviews in edited volumes...

Back Cover

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