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In this transnational account of black protest, Nicholas Grant examines how African Americans engaged with, supported, and were inspired by the South African anti-apartheid movement. Bringing black activism into conversation with the foreign policy of both the U.S. and South African governments, this study questions the dominant perception that U.S.-centered anticommunism decimated black international activism. Instead, by tracing the considerable amount of time, money, and effort the state invested into responding to black international criticism, Grant outlines the extent to which the U.S. and South African governments were forced to reshape and occasionally reconsider their racial policies in the Cold War world.

This study shows how African Americans and black South Africans navigated transnationally organized state repression in ways that challenged white supremacy on both sides of the Atlantic. The political and cultural ties that they forged during the 1940s and 1950s are testament to the insistence of black activists in both countries that the struggle against apartheid and Jim Crow were intimately interconnected.

Table of Contents

  1. Cover
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  1. Title Page, Copyright Page
  2. pp. i-vi
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  1. Contents
  2. pp. vii-x
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  1. Acknowledgments
  2. pp. xi-xiv
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  1. Abbreviations in the Text
  2. pp. xv-xviii
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  1. Introduction
  2. pp. 1-20
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  1. Part I: Cold War
  2. pp. 21-22
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  1. 1. South Africa, the United States, and the Racial Politics of the Cold War
  2. pp. 23-36
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  1. 2. Selling White Supremacy in the United States
  2. pp. 37-62
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  1. Part II: Travel, Politics, and Cultural Exchange
  2. pp. 63-64
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  1. 3. Crossing the Black Atlantic: Travel and Anti-Apartheid Activism
  2. pp. 65-90
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  1. 4. African American Culture, Consumer Magazines, and Black Modernity
  2. pp. 91-114
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  1. Part III: Challenging Anticommunism
  2. pp. 115-116
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  1. 5. Black Internationalism, Anticommunism, and the Prison
  2. pp. 117-138
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  1. 6. Political Prisoners: Heroic Masculinity and Anti-Apartheid Politics
  2. pp. 139-156
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  1. Part IV: Gender and Anti-Apartheid Politics
  2. pp. 157-158
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  1. 7. Motherhood, Anti-Apartheid, and Pan-African Politics
  2. pp. 159-183
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  1. 8. The National Council of Negro Women and Apartheid
  2. pp. 184-206
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  1. Conclusion
  2. pp. 207-214
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  1. Notes
  2. pp. 215-274
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  1. Bibliography
  2. pp. 275-298
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  1. Index
  2. pp. 299-306
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Additional Information

ISBN
9781469635309
Related ISBN
9781469635279
MARC Record
OCLC
1007134939
Pages
324
Launched on MUSE
2017-12-13
Language
English
Open Access
No
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