Cover

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Title Page, Series Page, Copyright, Dedication

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pp. i-vi

Contents

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pp. vii-viii

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Acknowledgments

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pp. ix-xiv

I have been thinking about, researching, and writing this book for close to twenty years. It has taken many forms, but never a book, until now. I thank all of those who traversed these seemingly impractical and distracted roads with grace, kindness, and humor. I want to thank...

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Introduction: Diasporic Histories and Archival Hauntings

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pp. 1-24

In 1995, on a very hot summer day in el club cubano del South Bronx, I interviewed Melba Alvarado for the first time. I wanted to learn about her activism, politics, and work. I wondered how it felt to be one of the first female presidents of El Club Cubano Inter-Americano (CCI), an...

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1. Rhetorical Geographies: Annexation, Fear, and the Impossibility of Cuban Diasporic Whiteness, 1840–1868

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pp. 25-60

On December 3, 1856 the New York Daily Times published a scathing critique of the Day Book’s support of slavery in both the South and in Cuba. The Daily Times ridiculed the Day Book and claimed that it had more in common with the pro-slavery politics of the Charleston Mercury...

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2. “With Painful Interest”: The Ten Years’ War, Masculinity, and the Politics of Revolutionary Blackness, 1865–1898

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pp. 61-96

On a cold December evening in 1872, hundreds of African Americans and “a few foreign negroes” attended a meeting organized by the newly formed Cuban Anti-Slavery Society.4 There, inside the Great Hall of the Cooper Institute, also known as the Cooper Union, Samuel Raymond...

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3. In Darkest Anonymity: Labor, Revolution, and the Uneasy Visibility of Afro-Cubans in New York, 1880–1901

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pp. 97-138

On August 5, 1883, a group of Cuban migrants “composed principally of cigar-makers, many of whom are negroes,” met in the basement of Clarendon Hall in New York City to “perfect its organization.” Settling on the name El Club de los Independientes No. 1, the members elected Cirilo...

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4. Orphan Politics: Race, Migration, and the Trouble with ‘New’ Colonialisms, 1898–1945

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pp. 139-192

On November 16, 1899, less than a year after the Treaty of Paris was signed and during the military occupation of the island, the governor of Havana, Brigadier-General William Ludlow, was invited to speak to the members of the Cuban Orphan Society in New York City. In his...

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5. Monumental Desires and Defiant Tributes: Antonio Maceo and the Early History of El Club Cubano Inter-Americano, 1945–1957

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pp. 193-226

At the corner of 59th Street and the Avenue of the Americas at Central Park South, there is a grand and majestic sculpture of José Martí. Made of bronze, the large and imposing statue depicts Martí on horseback at the very moment he is killed in battle. Sculpted by the renowned artist Anna...

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Epilogue

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pp. 227-230

On September 18, 2015, El Club Cubano Inter-Americano celebrated its seventieth anniversary at the esteemed American Negro Theater at the Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture. Celebrating its own seventy-fifth anniversary, the American Negro Theater proved a...

Notes

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pp. 231-278

Bibliography

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pp. 279-294

Index

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pp. 295-310

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About the Author

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p. 311

Nancy Raquel Mirabal is Associate Professor in the American Studies Department and US Latina/o Studies Program at the University of Maryland, College Park. She currently directs the US Latina/o Studies Program, and serves on the Advisory Board for the Center for Global...