Cover

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Title Page, Series Page, Copyright, Dedication

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pp. i-vi

Contents

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pp. vii-viii

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Foreword

LeAnne Howe

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pp. ix-xiv

I’ve been thinking about American Indians as “Noble Savages” for decades, hence, the series of Noble Savage poems in Evidence of Red (2005). Recently one of my new poems, “Noble Savage Learns to Tweet” from 99 Poems for the 99 Percent: An Anthology of Poetry, has had new life as a video poem...

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Introduction

Becca Gercken

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pp. xv-xxiv

There are clear and profound differences between Indigenous gaming in the United States and Canada, and yet academics and nonacademics, American and Canadian Indians, and European Americans and European Canadians make sweeping generalizations about North American Aboriginal casinos...

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Pan-tribal Nationalist Fantasy

Scott Andrews

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pp. xxv-xxvi

"Columbus Day 2092” is a modest appetizer to the main course of the essays offfered here. It is a daydream, a little game of “what if,” a pan-tribal nationalist fantasy.
I realize that pan-tribal and nationalist may seem contradictory, since a pan-tribal perspective crosses national/tribal boundaries. However, despite...

Columbus Day 2092

Scott Andrews

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pp. xxvii-xxx

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Raised Stakes: Writing on/and the New Game of Chance

Becca Gercken

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pp. 1-22

Both Indian and non-Indian readers of contemporary Native American literature recognize gaming as shorthand for identity politics; gaming foregrounds questions of identity (both individual and communal), authenticity, history, and sovereignty in a compact yet complicated space. The...

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An Interview with Jim Denomie

Heid E. Erdrich

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pp. 23-32

Jim Denomie (Ojibwe) was born in Hayward, Wisconsin, on July 6, 1955, and currently lives in Franconia, Minnesota. Primarily a painter (oil, acrylic, and watercolor), he also creates unique works of art in ink, oil pastel drawings, printmaking, photography, and found object sculpture. In 1995, Denomie...

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The Noble Savage as Entrepreneur: Indian Gaming Success

Julie Pelletier

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pp. 33-56

As a researcher who has studied American Indian casinos and gaming since 1994, I have encountered a narrow range of reactions to my work. Depending on the context, I may be asked about gaming and gambling as sin—this comes up primarily in the United States and, yes, in academic...

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(Re)Imagining First Nations Casinos: A Necessary Response to Ensure Economic Development

Yale D. Belanger

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pp. 57-84

In recent years First Nations casino operations in Canada have settled into predictable operational patterns.1 Apart from the negligence that temporarily plagued the Saskatchewan Indian Gaming Authority (SIGA) in the early 2000s,2 the seventeen national for-profit First Nations casinos are accomplished...

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Casinos, Culture, and Cash: How Gambling Has Afffected Minnesota Tribal Nations

Caroline Laurent

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pp. 85-110

Since the early 1980s, the income generated by Indi an gaming establishments has poured a new stream of revenue into reservations. This influx of money became particularly visible after the Indian Gaming Regulatory Act (IGRA) of 1988 was enacted and tribes started high-stakes gaming on a larger scale...

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“It’s a Question of Fairness”: Fee-to-Trust and Opposition to Haudenosaunee Land Rights and Economic Development

Meghan Y. McCune

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pp. 111-134

Stereotypes and misconceptions about Indigenous sovereignty, particularly gaming, are rampant throughout the United States and are reflected in pop culture discourses. The satirical cartoon South Park took up the issue of Indian gaming in 2003, dedicating an entire episode titled “Red Man’s...

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Masking Anishinaabe Bimaadiziwin: Uncovering Cultural Representation at Casino Rama

Darrel Manitowabi

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pp. 135-158

Located in the Chippewas of Rama First Nation in south-central Ontario, Casino Rama was the only Aboriginal commercial casino in the province until 2011.1 Officially opened in 1996, the casino is rich in Chippewa/Anishinaabe cultural representations in order to stress the Indigenous context of the...

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About the Contributors

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pp. 159-161

Scott Andrews, a member of the Cherokee Nation of Oklahoma, is a professor in the English department and the American Indian Studies Program at California State University, Northridge. He has published reviews, essays, poetry, and fiction in various journals.
Yale D. Belanger is professor of political science at the..