Cover

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Title Page, Copyright Page

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pp. i-iv

Contents

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pp. v-vi

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Editors' Introduction

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pp. vii-xiv

This is our fourth volume since Histories of Anthropology Annual returned from the journals to the book division at the University of Nebraska Press. This may seem nothing but a structural question of production, but there are real distinctions between journals and books that are quite significant to the ways we conceived and continue to produce HoAA. After more than a decade we find ourselves reflecting on the peculiarities of an annual cycle of publication...

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1. Franz Boas as Theorist: A Mentalist Paradigm for the Study of Mind, Body, Environment, and Culture

Regna Darnell

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pp. 1-26

Franz Boas is uniformly credited as the dominant figure of American anthropology from the late nineteenth century to the Second World War. His stature as a public intellectual is acknowledged to have extended far beyond the borders of the discipline he established. Nonetheless, few contemporary anthropologists actually read Boas or have a clear sense of what he wrote or thought. Sadly, little of the enormous Boas scholarship is based on historicist engagement with his work. In the seven decades...

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2. "We Are Also One in Our Concept of Freedom": The Dewey-Boas Correspondence and the Invention of Postmodern Bourgeois Liberalism

Michael E. Harkin

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pp. 27-40

Franz Boas is known for his political activism, which both shaped his anthropology and was informed by it. In “Anthropology as Kulturkampf,” George Stocking (1992:92– 113) argues for understanding Boasian anthropology within the framework of progressive and reformist politics, which shifted during various phases of Boas’s life. As I have argued elsewhere, I believe that this trajectory continued beyond Boas’s lifetime and that American anthropology of the late twentieth and twenty- first centuries has become identified with a particular political...

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3. What Would Franz Boas Have Thought about 9/11?

Michael E. Harkin

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pp. 41-60

To ask what Franz Boas would have thought of 9/11 is obviously to engage in an act of historical and biographical imagination, but also one of self- examination. I would argue that we anthropologists, especially those of us trained in the great Americanist tradition of cultural anthropology and historical ethnography, feel that we know Boas. Indeed, we have internalized him in some way, like a beloved dead relative, and so, in some sense, his reaction is our reaction. As in any time of crisis, the crisis of the past decade that was ushered in on that bright September...

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4. Boas and the Young Intellectuals: Exploring the American Context of Anthropology and Modern Life

David W. Dinwoodie

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pp. 61-86

Alongside the study of innovation in so- called primitive societies, Franz Boas began operationalizing the anthropological study of (rather than reiterating the theoretical possibility of) the construction of the social position of newly minted social elites in Anthropology and Modern Life. In this chapter I will explore the American circumstances through which Boas articulated what we might call, following George W. Stocking Jr. (1965), enlightened anthropological presentism....

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5. Ruth Benedict: Synergy, Maslow, and Hitler

Frank A. Salamone

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pp. 87-106

The onset of World War II left Boasians in a quandary. There was a belief that anthropology had significant lessons to teach about being human and the plasticity of so- called human nature. There was also a strong stricture against generalizations, or at least generalizations at that time. However, although opposed to overgeneralization, Boasians did feel that there was a need to go beyond mere statements of specifics that bordered on exoticism. Alfred Kroeber, for example, wrote a...

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6. Continuity and Dislocations: A. I. Hallowell's Physical Anthropology

James M. Nyce and Evelyn J. Bowers

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pp. 107-134

This chapter reviews the contribution A. Irving Hallowell (1892– 1974) made to the study of human evolution and biological/physical anthropology (Shapiro 1967:608). Hallowell’s work in human evolution bridges the pre- and postmolecular periods in biological anthropology and the evolutionary and postevolutionary periods in cultural anthropology. Because of this transition, some central elements important to our understanding of human evolution may have been lost, that is, those elements of human evolution that are difficult to quantify or...

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7. An Epistemological Shift in the History of Anthropology: The Linguistic Turn

Robert C. Ulin

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pp. 135-156

Anthropology’s venerable and unusual tradition of self- critique addresses its complicity with colonialism and has sought, moreover, to periodically reconstitute its political relevance by addressing social inequality worldwide (Asad 1980[1973]; Hymes 1969). Toward this end, anthropologists have absorbed the critical insights from allied disciplines and the broad parameters of nonpositivistic critique. One only has to think of Marx or the numerous anthropologists who have been influenced by the Frankfurt School and the multiple contemporary...

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8. Westermarck and the Diverse Roots of Relativism

Andrew P. Lyons

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pp. 157-174

Cultural relativism is arguably an older concept than institutionalized anthropology. There are foreshadowings of it in the work of Herodotus, Protagoras, Sextus Empiricus, Johann Gottfried Herder, and Wilhelm von Humboldt. However, the genealogy of the concept in modern American anthropology may, as Regna Darnell shows (2001:39, 40), be correctly traced back to Boas’s 1889 article, “On Alternating Sounds,” which drew attention to the ethnocentrism that can result when scholars from our speech community apperceive one sound in another supposedly...

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9. Heritage Gatherers: Peasant-Mania Ethnography and Pre–World War I National Awakeners of Ukraine

Olga Glinskii

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pp. 175-198

The decades leading up to the First World War were marked with profound concerns over the identities and loyalties of the peasantry in eastern Europe.1 Particularly after the revolutions of 1848 swept across Europe, the looming question of uncertain allegiances of the peasant masses came to be one of the most pressing issues for the pre– World War I revolutionaries, the national awakeners, and the ruling elite in both the Russian and Austro- Hungarian Empires. In this formative context, Ukrainian national developments are inextricably intertwined...

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10. Adopting Western Methods to Understand One's Own Culture: Social and Cultural Studies by Vietnamese Scholars of the French Colonial Era

Nguyen Phuong Ngoc

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pp. 199-218

While studying Vietnamese intellectuals of the colonial era, I was struck by what an extraordinarily dynamic period it was, not only in terms of art and literature (fairly well documented already) but also in the intellectual and scientific spheres. My thesis (titled “The Beginnings of Anthropology in Vietnam: A Study of First- Generation Authors”) therefore sought to answer the following question: Under which conditions and with what results did the science of anthropology enter Vietnam? It was far from self- evident that this science, still in its infancy...

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11. Life in Hanoi in the State Subsidy Period: Questions Raised in Social Criticism and Social Reminiscences

Nguyen Van Huy

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pp. 219-252

The important exhibition Life in Hanoi in the State Subsidy Period, 1975– 1986 closed at the Vietnam Museum of Ethnology (VME) in the middle of 2007. The exhibition had been extended six months past the original plan to stay open one year, from June 2006 to June 2007. The public regretted the closing of the exhibition. Their regret not only surfaced at that time but continues even now whenever that period of time or the Vietnam Museum of Ethnology is mentioned, as the exhibition had...

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12. Between Ethnos and Nation: Genealogies of Dân Tộc in Vietnamese Contexts

Bradley Camp Davis

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pp. 253-266

The Vietnamese term dân tộc evades easy translation. Variously rendered as “nation,” “nationality,” or “ethnicity,” dân tộc connects historical and contemporary Vietnamese discourses of ethnic difference and national belonging to two intellectual projects. The first, most closely associated with reformers in Meiji Japan (1868– 1912), involved the rendering of European philosophical terminology into the logographic script common to Japanese, Chinese, Korean, and Vietnamese. The...

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13. Arthur Nole (1940–2015): Tahltan Elder, Raconteur, and Friend

Thomas McIlwraith

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pp. 267-282

Arthur Nole, Tahltan Indigenous elder and storyteller, died on January 3, 2015, after breaking his leg while chopping wood. He lived a life indicative of the complexities of Indigenous lives and, particularly, the meshing of traditional activities and wage work. He was a dedicated moose hunter and passionate hunting guide, and he was tremendously interested in the telling and recording of Tahltan history. His later life was dominated by family activities and motivated by teaching young people the traditional skills of camping, hunting, and life on the land....

Contributors

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p. 283