Cover

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Half Title, Series Page, Title Page, Copyright, Dedication

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Contents

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pp. vii-viii

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Foreword

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pp. ix-xii

Frédéric Neyrat’s Atopias is an important book. The contribution it makes to critical thought today is evident in its subtitle: Manifesto for a Radical Existentialism. A manifesto is a short declaration of principles and a program, rather than a fully extended analysis. Neyrat characterizes the present work as “a worried intervention in the field of theory,” rather than a declaration of eternal truths. ...

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Critique of Pure Madness

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pp. 3-12

Minerva at bay.—Philosophy borders madness. It lingers there, sometimes, extracting itself more or less successfully. But the successes that are too successful cancel out philosophy, as the Principle of reason that ought to guide it becomes a pure Principle of identity. If philosophy is “the reassurance given against the anguish of being mad at the point of greatest ...

Book I: Toposophy

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The Undamaged and the Contagious

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pp. 13-18

“Where am I?” asks the sleeper who wakes with difficulty. He doesn’t recognize the room, the furniture. It is too dark; lingering parts of the dream slip into the surroundings, giving them a strangely worrying air. But are we not living the inverse situation today? Prolonged awakening, work without the limit of time, excessive light, surplus of information, ...

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Saturated Immanence and Transcendence ≈ x

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pp. 18-22

Over the course of the preceding section, the terms “transcendence” and “immanence” were used many times. If saturated immanence is the principal ontological enemy, does this mean that philosophy today must assert a form of transcendence? We have already indicated the danger of Transcendence, with a capital T, ...

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Socratic Divergence

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pp. 22-27

To speak of a philosopher always entails philosophical interpretation. But to speak of Socrates entails an interpretation of philosophical interpretation itself. Here the difficulties multiply and would not cease were it not for some ultimate metalanguage. In the same way, every possible interpretation of a philosopher or a concept, no matter how minor, ...

Book II: Theory of the Trans-ject

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Being-Outside

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pp. 28-33

There is no philosophy except that of existence—even if there has always been an opposing tendency, consisting in simultaneously offering philosophy another object, as a piece split from the first: pure Idea, First Immobile Mover, God, Being, In-Itself, and so on. ...

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Coalitions

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pp. 33-37

At the beginning, there was more than One. But this was not yet known, or else it was known vaguely. We believed we were only One, and that the multiple would come together toward the end. We knew very well that the story of the One did not make sense—but precisely because nothing was able to remain, because everything was flowing, ...

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Ab-solved Freedom

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pp. 37-42

The other than the One is existence, finitude, or disjunction. In various ways, these three terms name existence liberated from that which would contain it, surround it, or prevent it from being, rendering any form of adventurous coalition impossible. In other words, existence and freedom are inseparable. ...

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Language and Disjoining

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pp. 42-47

We must still elucidate the fact that atopia requires a subjective position founded on the re-moval of that which prevents it from being. An ectopic spatiality—finite and free—has its interior correlative: an empty case, a crack. We would not be originally outside if the outside were not originally in ourselves. ...

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On the Subject of Animals

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pp. 47-51

From the subject to the structure and from the structure to the subject, from structuralism to post-structuralism: In all, we have progressed less than some would think. We have remained in the restricted frame of the human being and his structures or his ways of escaping them. ...

Book III: The Metaphysical Proposition

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The Transgression of the Principle of the Excluded Middle

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pp. 52-56

In the first two parts of this work, we have seen a certain number of concepts appear: the undamaged and the contagious, secret complicity, hydroglobe, absolute flux, saturated immanence and transcendence ≈ x, Socratic divergence, atopia, being-outside, existence, existential field, coalition, finitude, real projection and ideal projection, double advance, ...

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The Leap and the Loop

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pp. 56-60

No philosopher has ever left it there. Divergence is only the initial situation of philosophical thought, or where it ends up falling back, out of fatigue. Each time a concept is created, the principle of the excluded middle is transgressed. The question is to explain the gesture of transgression and what sort of creation results from it. ...

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The Unlocatable

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pp. 60-65

But it is not enough to wager. It is necessary to develop what the wager requires, beyond the mere creation of concepts, in the formation of metaphysical propositions. It can certainly seem difficult to take up the term “metaphysics” after all the attacks to which this term has been subjected: Did Nietzsche not declare that being is only a “fiction”?21 ...

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The Madwoman of the Out-of-Place

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pp. 65-70

Name for a science that does not have one, out-of-place, unlocatable character of the concept: All of these conditions are assembled to set new and imaginary doves flying in the “empty space of [the] pure understanding.”31 I want to affirm rather than to deny the relation of metaphysics to the imagination. ...

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Science(s), Art, Politics

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pp. 70-76

A double temptation threatens philosophy: to close in on itself, abstract itself absolutely from the world, or to want to become itself absolutely other. These two possibilities can coincide, resting on a closure into itself by which philosophy would believe itself to be the other—a science, Science, art, ..

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What Cries Out

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pp. 77-82

In truth, we have nothing much to say. Written or verbal profusion does not change this. To the contrary. Several intuitions, some revelations. An ordinary experience, a “miserable miracle” (Henri Michaux). Sometimes a grand event, that will have solicited us only on the basis of a barely felt rupture coming from the past, or of a strange and far-off pleasure ...

Notes

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pp. 83-94

Index

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pp. 95-100