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summary
Here, for the first time in English—and from the Mexican perspective—is the story of Mexican migration to the United States and the astonishing forced repatriation of hundreds of thousands of people to Mexico during the worldwide economic crisis of the Great Depression. While Mexicans were hopeful for economic reform following the Mexican revolution, by the 1930s, large numbers of Mexican nationals had already moved north and were living in the United States in one of the twentieth century's most massive movements of migratory workers. Fernando Saul Alanis Enciso provides an illuminating backstory that demonstrates how fluid and controversial the immigration and labor situation between Mexico and the United States was in the twentieth century and continues to be in the twenty-first.

When the Great Depression took hold, the United States stepped up its enforcement of immigration laws and forced more than 350,000 Mexicans, including their U.S.-born children, to return to their home country. While the Mexican government was fearful of the resulting economic implications, President Lazaro Cardenas fostered the repatriation effort for mostly symbolic reasons relating to domestic politics. In clarifying the repatriation episode through the larger history of Mexican domestic and foreign policy, Alanis connects the dots between the aftermath of the Mexican revolution and the relentless political tumult surrounding today's borderlands immigration issues.

Table of Contents

  1. Cover
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  1. Half Title, Series Info, Title Page, Copyright, Dedication
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  1. Contents
  2. pp. vii-x
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  1. Foreword to the English-Language Edition
  2. Mark Overmyer-Velázquez
  3. pp. xi-xviii
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  1. Foreword to the Original Edition
  2. Leticia Calderón Chelius
  3. pp. xix-xxii
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  1. Acknowledgments
  2. pp. xxiii-xxiv
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  1. Introduction
  2. pp. 1-10
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  1. 1: Migratory Movements between Mexico and the United States, 1880–1934
  2. pp. 11-29
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  1. 2: The Mexican Community in the United States, 1933–1939
  2. pp. 30-50
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  1. 3: The Mexican Government and Repatriation, November 1934–June 1936
  2. pp. 51-73
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  1. 4: From the Creation of the Demography and Repatriation Section to the Elaboration of a Repatriation Project, July 1936–October 1938
  2. pp. 74-100
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  1. 5: The Repatriation Project, 1938–1939
  2. pp. 101-126
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  1. 6: Spanish Refugees, the Repatriated, and the Lower Rio Grande Valley
  2. pp. 127-143
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  1. 7: The 18 March Agricultural Colony in Tamaulipas, 1939–1940
  2. pp. 144-158
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  1. 8: The End of the Project, 1939–1940
  2. pp. 159-196
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  1. Notes
  2. pp. 197-218
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  1. Bibliography
  2. pp. 219-232
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  1. Index
  2. pp. 233-246
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Additional Information

ISBN
9781469634289
Related ISBN
9781469634258
MARC Record
OCLC
1001288296
Pages
272
Launched on MUSE
2017-08-23
Language
English
Open Access
No
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