In this Book

Folklore in Motion
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summary
The adventurous spirit of Texans has led to much travel lore, from stories of how ancestors first came to the state to reflections of how technology has affected the customs, language, and stories of life “on the go.” This Publication of the Texas Folklore Society features articles from beloved storytellers like John O. West, Kenneth W. Davis, and F. E. Abernethy as well as new voices like Janet Simonds. Chapters contain traditional “Gone to Texas” accounts and articles about people or methods of travel from days gone by. Others are dedicated to trains and cars and the lore associated with two-wheeled machines, machines that fly, and machines that scream across the land at dangerous speeds. The volume concludes with articles that consider how we fuel our machines and ourselves, and the rituals we engage in when we’re on our way from here to there.

Table of Contents

  1. Cover
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  1. CONTENTS
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  1. Preface
  2. pp. vii-xi
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  1. I. Folk Travel in Texas
  2. pp. 1-2
  1. Texans on the Road: The Folklore of Travel
  2. pp. 3-12
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  1. Traveling Texan
  2. pp. 13-24
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  1. Red River Bridge War
  2. pp. 25-34
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  1. Wagon Train Experience
  2. pp. 35-50
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  1. Farm and Ranch Entrances in West Texas
  2. pp. 51-57
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  1. II. Back in the Day
  2. pp. 58-60
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  1. Legends of the Trail
  2. pp. 61-76
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  1. The Passage of Scotland’s Four/El Pasaje de los Cuatro de Escocia
  2. pp. 77-82
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  1. Gone to (South) Texas
  2. pp. 83-98
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  1. Fannie Marchman's Journey from Atlanta, Georgia to Jefferson, Texas—by Railroad, Steamboat, and Horse and Wagon, in 1869 and Beyond
  2. pp. 99-112
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  1. Walter Henry Burton’s Ride—Bell County to Juarez, Mexico in 1888
  2. pp. 113-122
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  1. The Galloping Gourmet; or, The Chuck Wagon Cook and His Craft
  2. pp. 123-138
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  1. The Language of the Trail Drivers: An Examination of the Origin and Diffusion of an Industry-Oriented Vocabulary
  2. pp. 139-145
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  1. III. The Modern Era: Tales of Rails and Highways
  2. pp. 146-148
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  1. Rail Remembrances: The Train in Folk Memory and Imagination
  2. pp. 149-158
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  1. Safe in the Arms of Trainmen
  2. pp. 159-164
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  1. Tales of the Rails
  2. pp. 165-174
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  1. The Ford Epigram
  2. pp. 175-182
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  1. Watch the Fords Go By: The Automobile Comes to Old Bell County
  2. pp. 183-192
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  1. “Driving Across Texas at Thirty-Five Miles Per Hour”
  2. pp. 193-201
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  1. IV. Still Movin’ On, Any Way They Can
  2. pp. 202-204
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  1. High Flyin’ Times: Adventures in a Piper Cub PA-12 Supercruiser and a Piper Tri-Pacer
  2. pp. 205-218
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  1. Back in the Saddle Again: Riding the Chrome-moly Horse
  2. pp. 219-226
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  1. Iron Butt Saddlesore
  2. pp. 227-244
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  1. The Unspoken Code of Chivalry Among Drag Racers
  2. pp. 245-252
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  1. Eating Up Route 66: Foodways of Motorists Crossing the Texas Panhandle
  2. pp. 253-266
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  1. There’s Life Beyond the Sonic: Growing Up Cruising
  2. pp. 267-272
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  1. Contributors’ Vitas
  2. pp. 273-280
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  1. Index
  2. pp. 281-307
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