Cover

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Half Title, Series Info, Title Page, Copyright

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Contents

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pp. v-vi

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Acknowledgments

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pp. vii-viii

This book would not have been possible without the incessant inspiration I received from conversations with many colleagues and friends. I am indebted to, among many others, Andrew Cole, Mirt Komel, Pierre Macherey, Catherine Malabou, Jamila M. H. Mascat, Robert Pfaller, Slavoj Žižek, ...

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Foreword: Hegel or Spinoza? Yes, Please!

Mladen Dolar

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pp. ix-xii

At a famous spot in the lectures on the history of philosophy Hegel emphatically proclaimed: “Either Spinozism or no philosophy at all” (Entweder Spinozismus oder keine Philosophie).1 It is true that Hegel, in the picturesque dramaturgy of his lectures given to an enthralled audience, never missed a chance to praise or scold, ...

Note on Sources and Abbreviations

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pp. xiii-xiv

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Introduction. Hegel and Spinoza: The Question of Reading

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pp. 3-15

For Hegel, Spinoza’s philosophy presented an irresistibly attractive and at the same time relentlessly provocative system of thought. If we were to list Hegel’s main incentives, that is to say, his necessary interlocutors, his favorite adversaries, we would be forced to put Spinoza’s philosophy near the very top, perhaps even directly below Hegel’s polemics ...

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1. Hegel’s Logic of Pure Being and Spinoza

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pp. 16-36

What does the beginning of Hegel’s logic have to do with Eastern Europe, specifically with Vilnius, Lithuania? In the buildup to the U.S.-led invasion of Iraq in 2003, Secretary of State Colin Powell made an infamous address to the Security Council of the United Nations. He argued persuasively, if not quite irrefutably, in support of the invasion, ...

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2. History Is Logic

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pp. 37-58

Hegel’s logic of being echoes historical and philosophical questions about the Orient, the Eleatics, and Spinoza.1 But at the same time the logical principle of the sameness of being and nothing, which is grounded on the rejection of the Oriental principle ex nihilo nihil fit, is also the principle of the history of philosophy ...

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3. Telos, Teleology, Teleiosis

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pp. 59-81

Pierre Macherey claims that the philosophy of Spinoza is something that the Hegelian system cannot digest, something that cannot be integrated in its “totalizing dialectics.” It is for this reason that Hegel “obsessively” returns to it: “Spinoza haunts the Hegelian system throughout its unfolding. The obsession, of which he is a symptom, is not immediately undone; ...

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4. Death and Finality

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pp. 82-103

With almost every historical philosopher he discussed, Hegel pointed to at least some sort of an interesting relation, if not full accord, between his life and his philosophy. In his account of Spinoza’s philosophy, he put a special emphasis on Spinoza’s ethnic descent. In fact, Spinoza was born in a Sephardic Jewish family, which emigrated from the Iberian Peninsula ...

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5. Ideology and the Originality of the Swerve

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pp. 104-120

The productive philosophical opposition between Spinoza and Hegel may be seen as a rearticulation of the ancient principles of Parmenides and Heraclitus, principles of being and becoming. At the same time, the philosophical reverberations of the event of “Hegel and Spinoza” reach well into contemporary discussions. ...

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Conclusion. Substance and Negativity: The Primacy of Negativity

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pp. 121-146

One of the most fundamental theses of contemporary philosophy is that of the primacy of negativity. Of course, the question of negativity itself has been present in philosophical tradition since its very beginnings. In a way it is the philosophical question, discussed throughout history in antiquity, by the Scholastics, in philosophical mysticism, in German idealism ...

Notes

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pp. 147-166

Bibliography

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pp. 167-172

Index

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pp. 173-181