Cover

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Title Page, Copyright Page

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pp. i-iv

Contents

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pp. v-viii

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Introduction. Favelas: Challenging a Perverse Policy of Exclusion

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pp. 1-12

There is no widely accepted definition of the term “favela.” In 2010, the Brazilian Institute of Geography and Statistics defined favelas as irregular settlements in subnormal agglomerates. A subnormal agglomerate is described as an area with a minimum of fifteen household units, lacking essential infrastructure, services, and legal standards, occupying one third of a public or private property and arranged in a disorderly, dense way. The 2010 census identified around 6,329 subnormal agglomerates with...

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1. Photographs and Favelas: Toward a Process of Self-Discovery and Belonging

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pp. 13-42

Whenever we open newspapers or watch local, national, or world news, we are invaded with an overflow of images of violence typically revolving around drug trafficking, kidnapping, robberies, and terrorist attacks. In a large majority of the cases, these scenes are decontextualized, and “violence . . . [appears] as the ‘spontaneous generation’ with no relation to the economy, the social injustices, [it] is addressed in a spectacular way” and circumscribed to specific territories and social segments (Bentes, “O...

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2. Videos, Favelas, and Childhood: Reclaiming New Symbolic Geographies

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pp. 43-67

Since the beginning of the twentieth century, several documentaries and films have incorporated carnival and samba as part of the cultural map of the city of Rio de Janeiro. However, it was Favela dos meus amores, directed by Humberto Mauro and released in 1935, that actually introduced the favelas and their black and poor residents as part of the urban cultural landscape (Napolitano 143).1 According to Marco Napolitano, the fi lm was...

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3. Favelas for Sale: Resisting the Easy Links between Democracy and Urban Restructuring Plans

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pp. 68-93

The growth of urban population and the consequent rising demand for housing and land has imposed a heavy strain on major cities in Brazil. In general, this has implied great challenges in terms of infrastructure and basic social needs along with the adoption of oppressive policies to guarantee urban safety. It has also provided the necessary ground for the proliferation of favelas in the urban context. In the case of the city of Rio de...

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4. Monuments and Consumption: Defying Mechanisms of Social and Spatial Stratification

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pp. 94-122

In an interview given to O Globo on June 2013, Eduardo Paes, the mayor of the city of Rio de Janeiro, explained that he envisions Rio 2017 not only “as a friendly resort, but . . . also [as] a city of diversifi ed culture, a sophisticated creative economy, a sector of research and intense development” (Motta, Tabak, and Delmas).1 At one point during the interview, the mayor affirms that one of the most important legacies of his administration will be the presence of “a more integrated city, more just, the best...

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Conclusion. Competing Discourses: Capital, Spatial Imaginaries, and Citizenship

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pp. 123-138

Faced with an unprecedented scale and speed of urban interventions and accentuated levels of inequality, cultural producers from marginalized territories propose other ways of imagining the city. Their videos and photographs function as a site of negotiation for more inclusive, space- based notions of citizenship. The interrogation of assumptions that are taken for granted is not an easy task. In his book, Cultural Action for Freedom, Paulo Freire advocates for a form of education that allows individuals to learn to...

Acknowledgments

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pp. 139-140

Notes

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pp. 141-152

Works Cited

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pp. 153-168

Index

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pp. 169-176