Cover

pdf iconDownload PDF
 

Title Page, Copyright

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. i-iv

Contents

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. v-vi

read more

Acknowledgments

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. vii-viii

I wish to warmly acknowledge the Institute for Scholarship in the Liberal Arts, University of Notre Dame, for its support toward the publication of this volume and to thank Sam Fisher for his help in the final stages of putting this volume together.

read more

Introduction: From Popular Mythology to History and Memory

Jim Smyth

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 1-8

Among the more abiding clichés about the Irish and their troubles are that they are locked into history, that their perceptions of that history are lethally divisive—“anniversaries are the curse of Ireland,” remarked Sir Kenneth Broomfield1—and that politics and conflict are driven by...

read more

1. The Truth about the Troubles

Ian McBride

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 9-43

Northern Ireland is a small region, comparable in size to Yorkshire or Connecticut, and with just 1.8 million inhabitants. But for scholars and students interested in the burgeoning field of memory studies it presents a vast academic safari park. Where else can we find a society—or perhaps...

read more

2. The Provisional IRA: History, Politics, and Remembrance

Ruan O’Donnell

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 44-76

Although the focus of a burgeoning bibliography, the Irish Republican movement has contributed little to academic studies of the organization. A culture of secrecy within armed Republicanism was assiduously promoted from the 1790s when the Defenders and United Irishmen...

read more

3. Beating the Retreat on a Contested Past? The British Army and the Politics of Commemoration in Northern Ireland

Aaron Edwards

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 77-95

With the withdrawal of British troops from the streets and the drawdown of the military presence at the end of Operation Banner in 2007,1 the security landscape of Northern Irish society was transformed. The British Army’s long deployment during the “Troubles” had been characterized...

read more

4. “Climbing over Dead Brambles”? Politics and Memory within Ulster Loyalism

James W. McAuley

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 96-114

The Black Studies scholar and activist Martha Jones once described memory as the “place where past and present collide.”1 That clash involves a range of social processes including not just those of “remembering,” but also of “forgetting” and sometimes of politically constructed...

read more

5. The Past Never Stands Still: Commemorating the Easter Rising in 1966 and 1976

Margaret O’Callaghan

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 115-141

This chapter looks at aspects of Irish nationalist and republican commemorations of the Easter Rising of 1916 in 1966, two years before the outbreak of civil unrest in Northern Ireland, and at the height of conflict in 1976. But while the focus is on the commemorative practices of the...

read more

6. Remembering and Forgetting: The Official Republican Movement, 1970–1982

John Mulqueen

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 142-164

What we choose to remember is dictated by contemporary concerns, it has been suggested. Remembering—and forgetting—may involve promoting certain strands of the past and downplaying others. And, Ian McBride observes, there can be “fierce clashes between rival versions of...

read more

7. Milltown Cemetery and the Politics of Remembrance

Jim Smyth

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 165-178

On 16 March 1988, freelance loyalist operative,1 Michael Stone, lobbed two hand grenades into a throng of mourners gathered at the (Provisional) republican plot in Milltown Cemetery, Belfast. Stone considered himself a soldier, used military terminology, and, at a “professional” or...

read more

8. Experiencing the Troubles

Cathal Goan

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 179-195

Time and distance may bring new perspectives on and understanding of past events. The conference at the University of Notre Dame devoted to the topic “Remembering the Troubles”—Northern Ireland’s thirty years of civil unrest and sectarian strife—seemed ideally positioned; it did...

List of Contributors

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 196-198

Index

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 199-209