Cover

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Half Title, Further Series Titles, Title Page, Copyright, Dedication,

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Contents

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pp. vii-vi

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Acknowlegments

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pp. ix-x

While working on this project I have been blessed to have many colleagues, family and friends help make this book a reality. First and foremost is my wife, Denise. Not only has she been a source of comfort and encouragement but she has—even from our first date—challenged me to be a better scholar. ...

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Introduction

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pp. 1-8

In this book I argue that a self-imposed interdenominational transformation began in the American Presbyterian Church upon its reunion in 1758 and that the church’s experience during the American Revolution altered this process. The resulting interdenominational goals had both spiritual and national objectives. ...

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1. Foundations of Interdenominationalism, 1758–1765

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pp. 9-35

According to the Book of Matthew, following Jesus Christ’s resurrection, he met his remaining disciples on a mountain near Galilee and gave them their final instructions. Christ told them, “All power is given unto me in heaven and in earth. Go ye therefore, and teach all nations, baptizing them in the name of the Father, and of the Son, and of the Holy Ghost: Teaching them to observe all things, whatsoever I have commanded you.”1 ...

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2. Threats Inside and Out, 1765–1775

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pp. 36-57

If there was hope by 1765 that the Presbyterians would continue to progress on their interdenominational journey, immense clouds of doubt were seen gathering in the distance. On February 6, 1765, British Prime Minister George Grenville introduced the Stamp Act resolutions, helping to spark the American Revolution.1 The subsequent constitutional debates concerning the civil and religious liberties of the colonists ...

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3. Groaning “Under the Afflicting Hand of God,” 1775–1783

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pp. 58-79

As had happened during the French and Indian War, the war for American independence served as the catalyst for interdenominational change. In 1763, the year of the signing of the Treaty of Paris, the American colonists were proud to be British. By July 1776, however, the colonists declared their intent to be independent. The Presbyterians’ role in unifying the colonists aided this transformation, ...

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4. For Christ and Country: Interdenominationalism in the North, 1784–1801

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pp. 80-97

The postwar years finished the transformation process for the church’s interdenominational vision. Following the official cessation of hostilities after the Treaty of Paris in 1783, the Presbyterians saw themselves standing on the threshold of a new world, facing a new opportunity to realize their interdenominational goals. Prompted as they had been during the French and Indian War, ...

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5. Southern Presbyterians and Interdenominationalism, 1784–1801

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pp. 98-120

As the General Assembly encouraged its ministers and congregations to be more cooperative for the sake of Christ and country, the responses from their constituents varied. In the northern states, where the denomination was strongest, the ruling body was pleased with the interdenominational nationalism displayed through conventions and formal unions with the Connecticut Congregationalists, ...

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Epilogue

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pp. 121-130

In September 1801, Jonathan Freeman came before Hudson Presbytery to defend the use of hymns, especially those by Isaac Watts, in church. Echoing the sentiments of John Todd who made a similar presentation before the Presbytery of Hanover in 1762, Freeman contended that Christians and their churches would only benefit from singing “unto the Lord a new song.”1 ...

Notes

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pp. 131-164

Bibliography

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pp. 165-180

Index

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pp. 181-186