Cover

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Half Title, Series Info, Title Page, Copyright, Dedication

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Contents

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p. vii

List of Illustrations

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p. viii

Kiowa Pronunciations

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pp. ix-xii

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Preface

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pp. xiii-xviii

Given the grim economic depression of the 1930s, it is truly remarkable that the Laboratory of Anthropology in Santa Fe, New Mexico, sponsored two ethnographic field schools in the Southern Plains (Ewers 1992, x), an area typically overlooked by researchers favoring the indigenous cultures of the Southwest or the Northern and Central Plains. ...

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Acknowledgments

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pp. xix-xx

Research for this book started in 1983 when I first met Betty Tanedooah, who was a student in introduction to cultural anthropology taught by Thomas M. Johnson at Southern Methodist University. I was Tom’s teaching assistant. Betty introduced me to her husband, Clifton Tongkeamah (1932– 1993), and both introduced me to Kiowa culture. ...

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Introduction: Ethnographic Studies of Plains Indian Religions

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pp. 1-34

Numerous books and articles describe the nomadic horse and buffalo and semisedentary village tribes of the Great Plains, but scholarly sources covering indigenous religious beliefs and practices are scant. Few monographs are solely devoted to tribal religions, and material on religion is scattered piecemeal or restricted to a single chapter in many historical and ethnographic accounts. ...

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1. Kiowa History, 1832– 1868

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pp. 35-52

Kiowas interviewed in 1935 who were born during the prereservation period described religious beliefs and practices that developed after the Kiowas migrated from Western Montana to the Northwestern Plains toward the end of the seventeenth century. Kiowa migrations were concurrent with the movements of other peoples to the Northwestern and Northern Plains ...

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2. Kiowa Beliefs and Concepts of the Universe

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pp. 53-84

The Santa Fe Laboratory of Anthropology fieldnotes contain a wealth of information about Kiowa cosmology and concepts of power as well as and its manifestations and distribution throughout the universe. Most of the information about power was related by Mary Buffalo to Weston LaBarre. ...

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3. Acquiring, Maintaining, and Manifesting Power

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pp. 85-136

Among Plains tribes, power was ideally acquired through the vision quest rite by means of which a few fortuitous individuals received personal powers that protected them from enemies or gave them specific medical knowledge; a man’s power became his personal guide, a spirit force to be consulted when necessary. ...

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4. Bundles, Shields, and Societies

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pp. 137-196

During the zenith of the Plains horse and buffalo culture, men possessing dɔdɔ owned medicine bundles and shields representing powers that were activated by ritual and song. Since collective powers were more important than individual powers, the tribal medicine bundles were of utmost importance because they represented the spiritual well-being of the entire tribe. ...

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5. The Kiowa Sun Dance

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pp. 197-250

Scholars have emphasized for some time that “Sun Dance” is an improper translation of indigenous terms for the nineteenth-century ritual found in seventeen Plains tribes and among the Utes and Wind River Shoshonis, Great Basin tribes at the periphery of the western Plains. The term “Sun Dance” probably originated in the mid-nineteenth century ...

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Conclusion: The Collapse of the Horse and Buffalo Culture and the Sun Dance

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pp. 251-280

Mooney (1898) and Nye (1937) are the best secondary sources describing Kiowa history between 1868 and 1875, though a handful of articles appearing in The Chronicles of Oklahoma also describe events during this period.1 Eyewitness accounts by Friend Battey (1968) relate details about events related to the Red River War. ...

Appendix: Kiowa Sun Dance Chronology, 1833–1890

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pp. 281-286

Notes

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pp. 287-312

Bibliography

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pp. 313-334

Index

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pp. 335-362

Further Series Titles

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Images

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