Cover

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Title Page, Copyright, Dedication

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pp. 1-3

Contents

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pp. 4-5

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The region

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p. 6

‘Kruger’ is one of the world’s best known national parks, whose mention immediately conjures up visions of an untouched, vast landscape filled with African megafauna and other wildlife From Kruger’s splendid elephants to the most insignificant beetles or butterflies, the sheer diversity of life in this stunning setting creates a lasting impression...

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About this book

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p. 7

Until relatively recently, most people were drawn to Kruger National Park because of the large mammals, and the chance of being able to see all of the ‘Big 5’ of Lion, Leopard, African Buffalo, African Elephant and ‘Rhinoceros’ (of which there are actually two species – Black Rhinoceros and White Rhinoceros). Now, of the nearly 1·4 million visitors that come...

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The seasons and timing your visit

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p. 8

Kruger has two distinct seasons: a hot and wet rainy period from October to March, and a cool and dry period from April to September But both seasons are good for birding, offering a different suite of species The best time to visit...

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The habitats

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pp. 9-13

Kruger’s complex geology results in many different habitats Most of the area comprises flat or gently undulating plains at an altitude of 250–400 m, although there are isolated hills (inselbergs or kopjes) The Lebombo Mountains create a series of low hills in the eastern half of the park To the north of Punda Maria, and in the extreme southwest...

Map showing the distribution of habitats in Kruger National Park

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p. 14

Map of Kruger National Park and adjacent private concession areas forming the Greater Kruger National Park conservation area

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p. 15

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Introduction to the species accounts

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pp. 16-17

This book covers 259 of the 500 or so species of bird that have been recorded in the Kruger National Park Six of these species are particularly large and charismatic, and are considered to be the...

Birds of Rivers and Wetlands

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Cormorants and darter

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pp. 18-19

Cormorants and darters swim and dive underwater from the surface, to feed on fish, frogs and aquatic insects. Unlike most aquatic birds, they do not have waterproof body feathers, so quickly get cold and waterlogged. As a consequence, they can neither spend...

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Wetland herons

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pp. 20-21

Herons and egrets stand or stride along the water’s edge, waiting patiently for a chance to catch a fi sh or frog with a lightning strike of the bill...

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Wetland white egrets

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pp. 22-23

Similar to Great Egret, this bird is smaller with a less coiled neck, and a relatively shorter bill; the gape line stops beneath the eye instead of extending farther back The bill is always yellow and the upper half of the leg is often greenish-yellow An uncommon visitor to Kruger, absent...

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Small wetland herons

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pp. 24-25

This very small, compact heron is mostly dark green, with yellow legs, and has a dark cap that can be erected as a short crest Immatures are browner and streakier than adults...

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Wetland storks

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pp. 26-27

A large, erect, dark brown stork, with a greenish and bronze iridescence on the wings and breast, a distinctive ruffed white neck, a white tail, a blackish ‘skullcap’ and face, and a dark bill with a salmon-pink...

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Wetland storks and Hamerkop

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pp. 28-29

Th is very large, tall, long-legged blackand- white stork has a unique and distinctive bill that is red, yellow and black Th e male has dark-brown eyes and frequently a yellow wattle at the bill base, while the female has yellow eyes...

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Spoonbill and Ibis

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pp. 30-31

A medium-sized, white waterbird with pink-red legs and bare face, and an odd and distinctive fl attened, spoon-tipped bill, which is obvious even in fl ight African Spoonbill occurs as an irregular visitor to Kruger, where it rarely breeds It prefers large, quiet...

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Geese and grebe

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pp. 32-33

A massive, heavily built, long-necked, black goose, with varying amounts of white on the head, belly and wings, and a warty red bill, face and legs In fl ight, the white forewings on the black body diff erentiate it from other waterfowl Th e male is much larger than the female Th is species is uncommon in Kruger, but...

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Geese and atypical ducks

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pp. 34-35

A bulky, mostly tan-brown goose with a chestnut back and wings and a distinctive black-tipped, pinkish bill, chestnut eye-ring, and chestnut spot in the centre of the breast. In flight it shows large, eyecatching white ovals on...

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Typical ducks

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pp. 36-37

A chocolate-brown duck with white spots on the back and rump, unmarked underparts, a pale pink-and-black bill and orange legs In flight it shows a bluish wing panel The similar Yellow-billed Duck is easily differentiated by its bright yellow bill African Black Duck is a secretive and scarce resident in Kruger, preferring well-wooded rivers...

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Rails and crakes

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pp. 38-39

A medium-sized and mostly dark rail usually seen at the water’s edge It is readily identified by the large red facial shield and yellow-tipped red bill, yellow-green legs (red above the joint), a characteristic white patch under the tail and white flank stripe Immatures are all-brown, including the bill, but have the same bold white patches under the tail as adults...

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Strange waterbirds

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pp. 40-43

Somewhat resembling a long-legged moorhen (page 38), this is a chestnut, white and black waterbird, with a short, sky-blue bill and frontal shield, and very long legs It trots on the surface of water lilies and other aquatic vegetation, with its ludicrously elongated toes preventing it from sinking It flies weakly, low over the water, with legs and toes...

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Lapwings

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pp. 44-45

This lapwing is identified by long yellow wattles, a white belly, and a grey head with a central white crown stripe The back is brown, and the wings and tail are strikingly black-and-white, giving it a distinctive appearance, especially in flight The superficially similar African Wattled Lapwing has a dark belly and red-based facia...

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Shorebirds

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pp. 46-51

A small, short-billed, brown-backed, white-bellied plover with two black breast-bands, grey cheeks, a white ring around the crown, and bright red skin around the eye and on the base of the bill It is an abundant breeding resident that is present on almost every patch of water in Kruger Calls “weet-weet” as it flies off when alarmed, showing prominent...

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Aquatic kingfishers

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pp. 52-53

Th is is a large, crested, black-and-white, waterloving kingfi sher Th e male has two complete black bands across the upper chest; the female has a single broken band An explosive metallic chattering draws attention to pairs and small...

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Birds associated with watersides and adjacent scrub

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pp. 54-57

This bulky, pipit-like ground bird has golden-yellow underparts and eyebrows, with a circular, broad black necklace emphasising its bright yellow throat The upperparts are a subdued streaky pale brown but the outermost corners of the tail are white, a key feature in flight It is a fairly common resident throughout Kruger, preferring wet grasslands...

Birds of Plains and Open Woodlands

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Ostrich, terrestrial herons and ibises

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pp. 58-59

Th is enormous, long-legged and long-necked fl ightless bird – the world’s largest – is easily identifi ed by size alone Males have black and white feathers, and pink-fl ushed skin when breeding; females have grey-brown plumage Th e Common Ostrich is uncommon and widespread in open...

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Terrestrial herons and terrestrial storks

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pp. 60-63

A typical heron in shape, this mostly grey bird with a distinct black cap and white throat (although juveniles are duskier) is a dry-land species It resembles a juvenile Grey Heron (page 21), but has slate-grey rather than yellowish legs and a darker bill At all ages the underwing pattern is much more strongly two-toned than on Grey Heron, with pale...

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Spurfowl and guineafowl

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pp. 64-65

Spurfowl are rounded, chicken-like ground birds in the francolin group This is a large, brown species, with some darker streaks, black legs, and distinctive bare red facial skin and throat patch It is common in Kruger, and bold and conspicuous, standing on open branches...

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Kori Bustard

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pp. 66-67

Bustards are stout-billed ground birds with long, thick legs. In flight, they reveal long, fingered wings and fly with their necks outstretched. The Kori Bustard is the largest bustard and has a black crest, a long greyish neck, brown back and black-andwhite dappling on the bend of the wing. Among Kruger’s birds, it is second only to the...

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Terrestrial lapwings and thick-knees

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pp. 68-69

Lapwings are medium-sized ground birds with long legs, short bills and broad, rounded wings Th e Crowned Lapwing is tall and brown with a white belly, and has a distinct white ‘halo’ ring around a dark crown Th...

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Hoopoe and sandgrouse

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pp. 70-71

A ground-hugging, buffy-orange, black and white bird, with a thin, downcurved bill It has a broad, fan-like crest which is occasionally raised, but often laid flat The flight action is slow and undulating, low to the ground with jerky beats of rounded black-and-white striped wings The African Hoopoe is a common resident in Kruger and often frequents...

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Little brown jobs or 'LBJs'

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pp. 72-73

One of the small, streaky, brown cisticolas, this is a tiny, short-tailed, warbler-like bird with pale spots on the tip of the tail It is a fairly common and widespread resident of Kruger’s grasslands, where it forages low down...

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Starling and chats

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pp. 74-75

Starlings are stout, sharp-billed, stronglegged birds that often walk and run along the ground Wattled Starling is grey-brown with dark wings and tail, and a whitish rump The pale bill and lemon-yellow facial skin in females and non-breeding...

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Shrikes

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pp. 76-77

Th is long-tailed, bulky, shrike is mostly black but has prominent white patches Small groups of 3–10 sit upright on perches in open areas where they pounce on, hawk and glean a wide range of invertebrate prey It is common...

Birds of Broadleaved Woodland and Camps

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Francolins

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pp. 78-79

A medium-sized, buff-brown francolin with a bushy crest that is sometimes raised, and a broad, ‘string-of-pearls’ collar around the white throat. It is a common and widespread resident, often found at picnic areas and in...

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Smaller bustards

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pp. 80-81

Korhaans are small bustards that walk stealthily on the ground; the Red-crested Korhaan has a black belly and diagnostic white chevrons on a brown-and-black-mottled back Th e male has a brown-grey neck and slaty cap, while the female is plainer...

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Small doves

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pp. 82-83

This small-bodied, greyish dove has a distinctively long, slender, pointed tail The male has a black throat and red-and-yellow bill, although these are lacking in the female In its dashing flight, the combination of reddish wings and long ‘pin-tail’ are diagnostic The Namaqua Dove is nomadic, being common to abundant in dry years and rare in wet...

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Collared doves

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pp. 84-85

The largest and stockiest ‘collared’ dove, with a pale-fronted, pinkish head and dark red eye In flight, the dirty-brown tail tips distinguish it from other ‘collared’ doves It is an abundant resident, especially in camps and picnic sites, and has an insistent and characteristic song “I AM a red-eyed dove” It feeds on seeds and other plant matter on the...

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Go-away-bird and cuckoos

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pp. 86-89

A slender, long-tailed and long-necked ash-grey bird, with a crest that can be raised or laid flat, a chunky black bill and a beady dark eye It forms small groups and is abundant in drier woodlands throughout Kruger, where it is estimated to number more than 65,000...

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Green cuckoos

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pp. 90-91

This small ‘green’ cuckoo is similar to Klaas’s Cuckoo and told by the pattern of green and white The male has white underparts with barred flanks, and iridescent green upperparts with strong white flecking on the wing, white patches in front of and behind the eye, and a prominent red eye-ring and eye The bronzy-green female has a diagnostic white patch...

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Mousebirds

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pp. 92-93

A slaty-grey, rather rotund, long-tailed mousebird with a naked red facial patch and red feet Th e tail is sleeker and longer than that of Speckled Mousebird, giving it a more streamlined flight There is also a pale patch on the rump which can be seen as a...

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Medium-sized woodland kingfishers

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pp. 94-95

A small and dainty woodland-dwelling kingfisher, less dramatically blue and grey than the larger species, with powder-blue tail and flight feathers, mouse-brown back, creamy collar, dark eyestripe and a streaky brown crown The bicoloured bill...

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Bee-eaters

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pp. 96-98

This is a large, strikingly coloured bee-eater with a chestnut-and-golden back, turquoise blue underparts, and a canary-yellow throat Females and juveniles are duller than males, and juveniles lack the adults’ pointed central tail feathers Although small numbers can occur year-round...

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Rollers

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pp. 99-101

A medium-sized, dark, rufous-cinnamon bird with a short, broad and chunky yellow bill In flight it is shaped much like a small, thickset falcon, but has deep wing beats and an undulating flight action It is an uncommon spring and summer visitor (September–April) to Kruger, particularly north of...

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Woodhoopoes

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pp. 102-103

An elongated, metallic green-black bird with a long, down-curved, red-orange bill, red legs and a long, floppy, white-tipped tail Juveniles have dark bills and resemble Common Scimitarbill, but are larger and normally accompanied by adults It is...

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Hornbills

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pp. 104-107

This small, black-and-white hornbill is readily identified by its relatively small red bill, males having a black base to the lower mandible The similar Southern Yellowbilled Hornbill is larger, with a robust yellow bill, and the rarer Crowned Hornbill (not illustrated) has a uniform brown back and orange bill The Red-billed Hornbill is a very...

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Barbets

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pp. 108-109

Tinkerbirds are tiny, woodland barbets This species is told by its yellow-orange forehead patch and prominently white-speckled black shoulders and back of the head The similar Yellow-rumped...

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Honeyguides

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pp. 110-111

The Lesser Honeyguide is similar to the Greater Honeyguide in overall shape and in having bold white outer tail feathers, but is much smaller It also has a chunkier bill with a small white spot at the base, a slate-grey head with black moustachial streaks, and an olive-green back (in contrast to the Greater Honeyguide which has a plain brownish...

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Woodpeckers

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pp. 112-115

A large, long-billed woodpecker with a brown back, barred belly, and strong black pattern on the head; the crown is black in the female and red and black in the male Although widespread and resident throughout Kruger’s lush savannah it is more solitary and less frequently encountered than other woodpeckers It gives sharp “kwip-kwip-kwip” calls, and...

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Black woodland birds

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pp. 116-117

A small, active and noisy black bird, with a short bill, white shoulders and white edgings to its wing feathers. It is a common resident in Kruger, particularly in broadleaved woodland, where...

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Common camp residents

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pp. 118-121

Bulbuls are upright birds with slight crests, rather stout bills and loud, musical songs Greenbuls and brownbuls (see page 170) are members of the same family but are generally larger and less conspicuous This slender, grey-brown bird with a pale belly, conspicuous yellow vent, black face, and a scruffy crest is an abundant resident in Kruger...

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Streaky ground-dwellers

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pp. 122-123

A tall, long-legged thrush with grey-brown upperparts, heavily streaked white underparts, and a strongly marked face with a bold black moustache, tear-stripe, and ear-crescent on an otherwise white face In flight it shows distinctive large buff patches in the wings This is a common resident of open woodlands and camps throughout Kruger...

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Other ground-dwellers

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pp. 124-125

Scrub-robins are like small thrushes in shape and behaviour This species has grey-brown upperparts, two diagnostic white wingbars, pale streaked underparts and a prominent white eyebrow and moustache A rufous rump and sides to the tail, and dark bar and white tips give the tail a distinctive appearance, especially when the bird is flying away...

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Canopy gleaners

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pp. 126-127

This small, long-tailed, canopy-dwelling, warbler-like bird has green upperparts, a grey head with a striking red eye, and a yellow breast and white belly separated by a variable black bar (sometimes lacking in the female) It...

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Thornveld inhabitants

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pp. 128-129

A small, big-headed, neatly patterned grey, black and white flycatcher-like bird with yellow eyes The sexes look quite different: the male has a broad black chest-band and a white throat; the female has a chestnut chest-band and large chestnut throat spot, which gives the species its name The Cape Batis (not illustrated), which is a rare visitor to...

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Flycatchers

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pp. 130-131

A nondescript, slender, upright, mouse-brown flycatcher with a softly streaked crown, throat and breast, appearing pale, silky buff-white when viewed from the front This species has longer wings and tail and a more peaked crown than the similar African Dusky Flycatcher (page 174) and does not have pale lores (in front of the eye) It...

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Bush-shrikes

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pp. 132-135

A small, canopy-loving, black-and-white bush-shrike with a fiery-red eye The fluffy white feathers on the rump of the male can be raised like a puffball when the bird is excited The sexes also look different: the male has a clean-cut black cap and a white throat, while the female is greyer on the head with a white forehead and partial eyebrow giving it a pale and...

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Helmet-shrikes and Southern White-crowned Shrike

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pp. 136-137

A gregarious, black-and-white helmet-shrike with a bouffant-like white-and-grey crest and piercing yellow eyes and eye-wattles It flies floppily from tree to tree, revealing a conspicuous pied pattern Although a common and widespread resident in Kruger, it seems to be more numerous in winter (June–August) It is found mainly in a variety of...

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Starlings

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pp. 138-139

A small starling with dramatically differentlooking sexes, although both have a distinctive lemon-yellow eye and a dark bill The male is stunningly iridescent, varying from brilliant violet to reddish-purple depending on the light, except for the pure white belly and vent...

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Glossy-starlings

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pp. 140-141

This large, long-legged starling is similar to Burchell’s Starling, being bright glossy blue-purple overall with a black face, but has a smaller body and a very long and graduated tail It is common in lush savannah from the...

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Oxpeckers

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pp. 142-143

Th e canary-yellow bill with a red-tip, red eye and pale rump on an otherwise brown bird is diagnostic Although juveniles lack the bright coloration of adult birds, they can be distinguished from juvenile Red-billed Oxpeckers by their pale rump Th e Yellow-billed...

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Sunbirds

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pp. 144-147

The male Marico Sunbird is the only green-hooded, dark-bellied sunbird in Kruger and has two iridescent bands across the upper breast – one deep purple and the other maroon The female is grey-brown, streaked on the underparts...

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Weavers

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pp. 148-151

Buffalo-weavers are large, thickset weavers Th e male Red-billed Buffalo-Weaver has dark plumage, red legs and a large, vermilion bill, whereas the female and juvenile are paler and streaky on the underparts Both sexes show obvious white wing patches in flight. This species’ status in Kruger is variable: although there are some birds present...

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Weavers and quelea

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pp. 152-153

The only weaver with an orange bill, dark brown back with yellowish margins to the wing, and a white belly The breeding male is distinctive, having a bright red head and upperbreast, and a black mask, while the female and non-breeding male have a yellow head and breast This is a widespread and fairly common resident in Kruger’s woodlands, joining...

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Bishop and widows

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pp. 154-155

A small, rotund, sparrow-like bird The breeding male shows an unmistakable mix of velvety vermilion and black, whereas the female and non-breeding male are nondescript, mainly identified by their small size, short tail, and strong buff...

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Waxbills

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pp. 156-159

This waxbill is readily identified by its entirely sky-blue underparts, rump and tail, silver-pink bill and grey-brown upperparts The female is paler than the male, and juveniles are mostly grey-brown with a powder-blue wash to the face It is a common and widespread resident in a variety of habitats in Kruger, favouring drier woodlands close...

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Whydahs

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pp. 160-161

L: 13 cm (5") (breeding male 34 cm (13·5")) The breeding male is a striking pied bird with a bright red bill: it has a small body but sports a 21 cm (8") long fine, wispy tail The buff-brown female and nonbreeding male have a reddish bill and a...

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Indigobird, canary and buntings

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pp. 162-163

A slender bunting with cinnamon underparts, black-and-brown mottled upperparts and a black-and-orange bill The male’s head is boldly striped black-and-white, while that of the female is less contrasting, with brown and buff stripes This is a common and widespread resident in Kruger, occurring on rocky outcrops and in open woodland and...

Birds of Forests and Riverine Thicket

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Guineafowl and turaco

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pp. 164-165

A large but small-headed, black, ground bird, perfectly lined with rows of hundreds of bluish-white spots It has a plumed ‘toupee’ above the naked face, and a distinctive ivorycoloured bill and blood-red eye In flight, its darker plumage and pale patch in the wing distinguish it from the Helmeted Guineafowl (page 65) This species is locally common...

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Fruit-eaters

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pp. 166-167

This smallish green parrot has yellow underwings and a plain brown head (although immatures are duller) The much larger (34 cm) and more robust Grey-headed Parrot (not illustrated) is very localized in Kruger, mostly from Punda Maria north, and is told by its green...

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Canopy specialists

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pp. 168-169

A strikingly large, mostly black hornbill with a white belly, rump, underwing coverts, and trailing edge to the wing It is easily identified by the huge grey-brown casque above the bill, longer in the male, and pinkish naked skin around the eye Pairs and small groups are locally...

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Forest greenbuls

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pp. 170-171

A fairly long-tailed, rather nondescript, uniform drab-olive bird, slightly paler on the belly, with striking pale eyes (although juveniles have dark eyes and a small yellow gape) It is a common resident throughout Kruger in the mid-storey and canopy of riverine forest and thickets, but is quite secretive and often first detected by its loud and shrill...

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Robin-chats

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pp. 172-173

A large, eye-catching, thrush-like robin-chat with striking orange underparts and collar, and a dark mask and crown split by broad white eyebrows; the back and wings are olivegrey This is a common resident in Kruger, favouring thick woodland and riverine forest, and becoming particularly confiding in camps Its vocalizations are distinctive: basic...

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Other small forest birds

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pp. 174-175

A small, upright, dumpy bird, with typical flycatcher habits, but a shorter tail and wings and slightly darker plumage than Spotted Flycatcher (page 130) In comparison, it also lacks...

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Southern Boubou

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p. 176

A plump dark-backed and dark-eyed bush-shrike with a pale throat, buff underparts and a striking white stripe on the dark wing The Black-backed Puffback (page 132) is superficially similar but is smaller and has a red eye In the far north, the Southern Boubou is replaced by the similar Tropical Boubou (not illustrated), which is paler below...

Birds of Prey and Vultures

Vultures in flight

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p. 177

Larger birds of prey in flight

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pp. 178-179

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Secretarybird and vultures

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pp. 180-181

The Sectretarybird is a very odd bird of prey in an ancient lineage and its own family It is a tall, long-legged, crane-like, ground-loving raptor with distinctive quill-like plumes on its head and bright-red facial skin In flight, the combination of dark trailing edge to the wing, diamond-shaped tail and long spatulate central tail projection is unmistakable...

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Vultures

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pp. 182-185

This impressive vulture is creamy-white overall and much paler and generally larger than the otherwise similar White-backed Vulture, and glides with its wings slightly raised At close range, the adults’ honey-coloured eyes and a speckled stripe across the middle of each wing are distinctive features The immature is heavily streaked (see page 177)...

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Brown eagles

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pp. 186-187

Th is eagle can sometimes be identifi ed solely by its combination of pale buff y coloration and large size However, it is a variable species, and some individuals are dark brown, leading to confusion with summer migrant eagles that have brown plumage It glides on fl at or arched wings...

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Large and distinctive eagles

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pp. 188-189

This impressive eagle, with a short but prominent crest, is Africa’s largest and one of the world’s heaviest The adult is uniform dark brown on the head, back and chest, and has a white belly with brown spots The immature is pale on the head...

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Hawk-eagle and Bateleur

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pp. 190-191

A medium-sized, boldly patterned, black-and-white eagle In flight, it holds its wings flat and adults show a unique pattern of brown-and-white underwings with a thick black trailing edge, and mostly white tail with a broad black terminal bar However, immature birds have entirely rufous underparts, including the...

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Crowned eagle and snake-eagles

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pp. 192-193

A very large, crested, boldly marked eagle The underparts are blotched and barred black and white, with a variable rufous wash across the breast In flight, the underside shows strong barring, although immatures are paler and less distinctly marked than adults and have creamy-tan underwings This species is an uncommon and localized resident in...

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Falcons

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pp. 194-195

A small, dark-backed falcon with a dark hood and long, dark ‘tear-drop’ moustachial streaks and ‘notch’ behind the eye that contrast with the white cheeks and throat The cere (fleshy area around the nostrils), eye-ring and legs are yellow...

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Kestrel and hawks

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pp. 196-199

This kestrel is mostly chestnut above with black spots, and with a grey head, black-banded grey tail and black tips to the wings Immatures are browner and streakier than adults with a more barred tail The plumage of the scarce migrant Lesser Kestrel (not...

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Kites and harrier-hawk

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pp. 200-201

A small powder-grey kite with a white tail, underparts and face, striking red eye, and black shoulders and flight feathers Immatures are browner than adults, with a scalloped brown back and tawny chest It is often seen perched up...

Birds of the Air

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Swifts

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pp. 202-203

This is a dark, bulky, powerful, high-flying swift with a distinct white throat patch and contrasting greyish inner flight feathers (secondaries) The very similar Common Swift (not illustrated) has a smaller throat patch and lacks a pale panel in the wing The African Black Swift is resident near Pafuri (Lanner Gorge) and a fairly common winter (June–August...

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Swallows

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pp. 204-207

This large swallow has rusty-red underparts, a pale buff throat, and white underwing coverts that are obvious only in flight It may be confused with juvenile Red-breasted Swallows, which have a pale throat, but that species always has dark ear patches and buffy underwing coverts Although it is resident throughout Kruger, the Mosque Swallow is...

Night Birds

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Nightjars and barn owl

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pp. 208-209

This is the only nightjar in Kruger with a pale trailing edge to the wings and entirely pale outer tail feathers – white in the male and buff (in poor light can appear dark) in the female At rest, it differs from the...

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Small owls

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pp. 210-211

This tiny, compact, camouflaged greybrown owl has small ear tufts that form slightly rounded corners to the top of the head It is a common resident throughout Kruger in a variety of woodlands Most camps have a pair or two, which are most...

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Large owls

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pp. 212-213

An enormous greyish owl with dark stripes framing the face, a silver-grey bill and large, dark eyes with strange and diagnostic fleshy-pink eyelids Although this is a widespread resident throughout Kruger, it occurs at low densities, preferring areas with large riverine trees for roosting, but avoiding forest This is the largest owl in Southern Africa, and...

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Pel's Fishing-Owl

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pp. 214-215

‘Old Ginger’ is probably the most near-mythical of all the bird species in Kruger It is an unmistakable giant, oval, ginger-rufous owl adorned with black bars and chevrons It has large and piercing deep, dark eyes, and ‘puffy’ feathers on the neck and head that give it a rounded profile This bird is so seldom seen that it would not normally...

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Further reading and online resources

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p. 216

This book focusses on the birds you are most likely to encounter during a safari in Kruger Inevitably, with over 500 species recorded in the park, you may come across a bird that is not covered and want to know what it is You may also want to know more about the other animals you encounter on your travels If this is the case, do not despair – there are a number of books...

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Acknowledgements and photographic credits

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pp. 217-218

Mark Lorenz commented on the manuscript Iain Campbell and Richard Barnes each joined Keith in the field for a week and also contributed their images Keith’s parents, wife and son all had their holidays turned into chances to take photos for the book, and their understanding is appreciated Thanks to the many photographers whose photos appear on these pages, and to...

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Scientific names of the bird species included in this book

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pp. 218-220

Most of the guides working in Kruger, and the majority of visitors, use English names when referring to the birds they see. However, some species have more than one English name, and given the diversity of countries from which visitors to the region come, these names may not be familiar to all. To help those visitors who know the birds by their...

Index

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pp. 221-224