In this Book

summary
Conceptions of the universal emancipation of humanity have, in practice, ended in failure. Marxism, anti-colonial nationalism and neo-liberalism have all understood the achievement of universal emancipation through a form of state politics. Marxism, which had encapsulated the idea of freedom for most of the twentieth century, has been found wanting because social interests and identities were understood as reflections of political subjectivity, which led to statist authoritarianism. Neo-liberalism and anti-colonial nationalism have also both assumed that freedom is realisable through the state, and have been equally authoritarian in their relations to those they have excluded on the African continent and elsewhere. Thinking Freedom in Africa conceives an emancipatory politics beginning from the axiom that ‘people think’; in other words, from a thought-practice which exceeds social place, interests and identities and which thus begins to think a politics of universal humanity. Engaging thinkers such as Alain Badiou, Jacques Rancière, Sylvain Lazarus, Frantz Fanon and many others, along with the inventive thought of people themselves in their experiences of struggle, the author analyses how Africans themselves – with agency of their own – have thought emancipation during various historical political sequences, and shows how emancipation may be thought today in a manner appropriate to twenty-first century conditions and concerns.

Table of Contents

  1. Cover
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  1. Title Page, Copyright, Dedication, Epigraph
  2. pp. i-vi
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  1. Contents
  2. pp. vii-viii
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  1. Foreword
  2. Ernest Wamba-dia-Wamba
  3. pp. ix-xii
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  1. Preface
  2. Michael Neocosmos
  3. pp. xiii-xvi
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  1. Acknowledgements
  2. pp. xxvii-xxx
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  1. Introduction: Politics is thought, thought is real, people think
  2. pp. 1-34
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  1. Part 1: Thinking political sequences: From African history to African historical political sequences
  1. 1. Theoretical introduction: Understanding historical political sequences
  2. pp. 37-68
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  1. 2. From Saint-Domingue to Haiti: The politics of freedom and equality, 1791–1960
  2. pp. 69-93
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  1. 3. Are those-who-do-not-count capable of reason? On the limits of historical thought
  2. pp. 94-111
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  1. 4. The National Liberation Struggle mode of politics in Africa, 1945–1975
  2. pp. 112-133
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  1. 5. The People’s Power mode of politics in South Africa, 1984–1986
  2. pp. 134-156
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  1. 6. From national emancipation to national chauvinism in South Africa, 1973–2013
  2. pp. 157-188
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  1. 7. Rethinking militancy in the current sequence: Beyond politics as agency
  2. pp. 189-221
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  1. 8. Understanding fidelity to the South African emancipatory event: The Treatment Action Campaign and Abahlali baseMjondolo
  2. pp. 222-240
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  1. Part 2: Opening up the thought of politics in Africa today: Exceeding the limits of sociology: Beyond representation
  1. 9. Theoretical introduction: Social representation, modes of rule and political prescriptions
  2. pp. 243-262
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  1. 10. Marxism and the politics of representation: The ‘agrarian question’ and the limits of political economy – class, nation and the party-state
  2. pp. 263-308
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  1. 11. Thinking beyond representation, acting beyond representation: Accounting for worker subjectivities in South Africa
  2. pp. 309-357
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  1. 12. Renaming the state in Africa today
  2. pp. 358-399
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  1. 13. Domains of state politics and systemic violence: The concept of ‘uncivil society’
  2. pp. 400-446
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  1. 14. The domain of civil society and its politics
  2. pp. 447-472
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  1. 15. The domain of traditional society and its politics
  2. pp. 473-520
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  1. 16. Towards a politics of solidarity: Feminist contributions
  2. pp. 521-531
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  1. Conclusion: Reclaiming the domain of freedom
  2. pp. 532-551
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  1. Bibliography
  2. pp. 552-592
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  1. Index
  2. pp. 593-644
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Additional Information

ISBN
9781868148691
Related ISBN
9781868148660
MARC Record
OCLC
1019663597
Pages
650
Launched on MUSE
2018-01-18
Language
English
Open Access
No
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