In this Book

summary

"The Only True People" is a timely and rigorous examination of ethnicity among the ancient and modern Maya, focusing on ethnogenesis and exploring the complexities of Maya identity—how it developed, where and when it emerged, and why it continues to change over time. In the volume, a multidisciplinary group of well-known scholars including archaeologists, linguists, ethnographers, ethnohistorians, and epigraphers investigate ethnicity and other forms of group identity at a number of Maya sites and places, from the northern reaches of the Yucatan to the Southern Periphery, and across different time periods, from the Classic period to the modern day.

Each contribution challenges the notion of ethnically homogenous "Maya peoples" for their region and chronology and explores how their work contributes to the definition of "ethnicity" for ancient Maya society. Contributors confront some of the most difficult theoretical debates concerning identity in the literature today: how different ethnic groups define themselves in relation to others; under what circumstances ethnicity is marked by overt expressions of group membership and when it is hidden from view; and the processes that transform ethnic identities and their expressions.

By addressing the social constructs and conditions behind Maya ethnicity, both past and present, "The Only True People" contributes to the understanding of ethnicity as a complex set of relationships among people who lived in real and imagined communities, as well as among people separated by social boundaries. The volume will be a key resource for Mayanists and will be of interest to students and scholars of ethnography, anthropology, and cultural studies as well.

Contributors: McCale Ashenbrener, Ellen E. Bell, Marcello A. Canuto, Juan Castillo Cocom, David A. Freidel, Wolfgang Gabbert, Stanley P. Guente, Jonathan Hill, Charles Andrew Hofling, Martha J. Macri, Damien B. Marken, Matthew Restall, Timoteo Rodriguez, Mathew C. Samson, Edward Schortman, Rebecca Storey

Table of Contents

  1. Cover
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  1. Half Title, Title Page, Copyright
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  1. Contents
  2. pp. v-vi
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  1. List of Figures
  2. pp. vii-viii
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  1. List of Maps
  2. pp. ix-x
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  1. List of Tables
  2. pp. xi-xii
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  1. Foreword
  2. Jonathan D. Hill
  3. pp. xiii-xviii
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  1. Chapter 1. Introduction: On Constructing a Shared Understanding of Historical Pasts and Nearing Futures
  2. Bethany J. Beyyette
  3. pp. 3-24
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  1. Part I: Maya Identities of the Present and the Ethnographic Past
  1. Chapter 2. Reimaging the World: Maya Religious Practices and the Construction of Ethnicity in a Mesoamerican Frame
  2. C. Mathews Samson
  3. pp. 27-46
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  1. Chapter 3. Ethnoexodus: Escaping Mayaland
  2. Juan Castillo Cocom, Timoteo Rodriguez, McCale Ashenbrener
  3. pp. 47-72
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  1. Chapter 4. Itzaj and Mopan Identities in Petén, Guatemala
  2. Charles Andrew Hofling
  3. pp. 73-90
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  1. Chapter 5. Maya Ethnogenesis and Group Identity in Yucatán, 1500–1900
  2. Matthew Restall, Wolfgang Gabbert
  3. pp. 91-130
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  1. Chapter 6. Differentiation among Mayan Speakers: Evidence from Comparative Linguistics and Hieroglyphic Texts
  2. Martha J. Macri
  3. pp. 131-154
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  1. Part II: Archaeological Explorations of Identity Construction
  1. Chapter 7. Establishing the Preconditions for Ethnogenesis among the Classic Maya of the Upper Belize River Valley
  2. Lisa J. LeCount
  3. pp. 157-186
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  1. Chapter 8. He’s Maya, but He’s Not My Brother: Exploring the Place of Ethnicity in Classic Maya Social Organization
  2. Damien B. Marken, Stanley P. Guenter, David A. Freidel
  3. pp. 187-218
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  1. Chapter 9. Considering the Edge Effect: Ethnogenesis and Classic Period Society in the Southeastern Maya Area
  2. Marcello A. Canuto, Ellen E. Bell
  3. pp. 219-242
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  1. Chapter 10. Copán, Honduras: A Multiethnic Melting Pot during the Late Classic?
  2. Rebecca Storey
  3. pp. 243-264
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  1. Chapter 11. Conclusion: Identity, Networks, and Ethnicity
  2. Edward Schortman
  3. pp. 265-278
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  1. List of Contributors
  2. pp. 279-280
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  1. Index
  2. pp. 281-288
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Additional Information

ISBN
9781607325673
Related ISBN(s)
9781607325666, 9781646420445
MARC Record
OCLC
973847546
Pages
306
Launched on MUSE
2017-03-02
Language
English
Open Access
Yes

Copyright

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