Cover

pdf iconDownload PDF
 

Half Title Page, Title Page, Copyright

pdf iconDownload PDF
 

Contents

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. v-vi

read more

Acknowledgments

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. vii-x

I graduated from a high school with a tradition: every graduating student­ writes­ a­ letter­ to­ him-­or­ herself­ that­ the­ school­ keeps ­for­ ten years, at which time these letters are mailed back to their authors. In my letter, I wrote vitriolic remarks about the suckers interested in undergraduate degrees. Only a fool, I wrote to myself knowingly, would want ­to ­attend ­university.­ ...

read more

Introduction

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 1-10

The­ challenge ­in­ writing­ on ­Wendell­ Berry’s­ fiction ­is­ to­ give­ an account of the Port William community that is neither sentimental­ nor­ quaint.­ Such­ characterizations­ can­ be­ easy ­to­ fall­ into­ /­ hard to avoid, depending on what one assumes about rural communities in general. ...

Part I: Moral ­Imagination­ and­ Community

read more

1. Imagination: The Poetics of Local Adaptation

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 13-32

Berry’s moral imagination consists in­ a ­relation to place.1 Its function is to see ­a­ place outside fixed cultural and social interpretative frameworks, recognize its integrity in terms of both its internal consistency and its participation in the rest of creation, and invite the imaginer to reflect on the claim this awareness makes. ...

read more

2. Affection: Community, Race, and Place

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 33-54

Reading William Carlos Williams on a bus in New Jersey prompted a­ radical ­shift ­in­ Berry’s­ life, ­a ­return­ to­ his ­roots.­ Williams’­ poetics­ also­ showed­ Berry­ what ­to­ do­ when­ he­ got­ home—­how­ to­ see,­ describe, preserve, and adapt to it so that his identity might consist in his belonging to place. ...

read more

3. Style: Berry’s Fictional Technique

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 55-78

Berry’s return home was the crucible of his imagination, tested as it was against the racial history still present in the landscape. His struggle to belong there, which outlines the role of imagination, affection, and community in local adaptation, is inherent in his fictional technique. ...

Part II: Biographies of Belonging

read more

4. Jack's Mind: Regret and the Virtue of Knowing

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 81-106

Local­ adaptation ­in ­Berry’s­ life ­is ­a­ “spiritual­ ambition, ­like ­goodness.” Plants and animals belong to their places naturally, but a person can only belong “by understanding and by virtue.”1 Recalling William Carlos Williams, for whom identity comes from arriving to a place in both body and spirit, ...

read more

5. Jayber's Soul: The Psychology of Magnanimous Despair

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 107-128

It is telling that Berry calls himself a “forest” Christian.2 The forest­ is­ Berry’s ­wilderness—­a­ “sacred­ grove ”­that­“ our sanity­ probably requires ­it.”3 To ­have­“ wilderness­ as ­standard”­ requires­ “religious­ deference” to keep pride and greed in check. ...

read more

6. Hannah's Body: Grief and the Space of Hopeless Patience

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 129-148

In the spring of 2012, New York Times ­columnist­ Mark­ Bittman­ sat down with Berry in preparation to write his boldly titled article “Wendell Berry, American Hero.” During the conversation, Bittman asked­ Berry­ a­ question ­he ­hears ­a ­lot:­ “What­ can­ city­ people­ do?” ...

read more

Conclusion

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 149-162

Avery ­Jenkins ­first­ contacted­ Bryan­ Stevenson ­by­ phone.1 Jenkins was on death row in Alabama for brutally stabbing an older man to death and wanted help from the Harvard Law graduate and executive­ director­ of ­the Equal ­Justice­ Initiative.­ ...

List of Abbreviations

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 163-166

Notes

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 167-234

Bibliography

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 235-254

Index

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 255-262