In this Book

summary
During the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, Americans with all sorts of disabilities came to be labeled as "unproductive citizens." Before that, disabled people had contributed as they were able in homes, on farms, and in the wage labor market, reflecting the fact that Americans had long viewed productivity as a spectrum that varied by age, gender, and ability. But as Sarah F. Rose explains in No Right to Be Idle, a perfect storm of public policies, shifting family structures, and economic changes effectively barred workers with disabilities from mainstream workplaces and simultaneously cast disabled people as morally questionable dependents in need of permanent rehabilitation to achieve "self-care" and "self-support."

By tracing the experiences of policymakers, employers, reformers, and disabled people caught up in this epochal transition, Rose masterfully integrates disability history and labor history. She shows how people with disabilities lost access to paid work and the status of "worker--a shift that relegated them and their families to poverty and second-class economic and social citizenship. This has vast consequences for debates about disability, work, poverty, and welfare in the century to come.

Table of Contents

  1. Cover
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  1. Half-Title, Frontispiece, Title Page, Copyright, Dedication
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  1. Contents
  2. pp. vii-viii
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  1. Charts and Illustrations
  2. pp. ix-x
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  1. Acknowledgments
  2. pp. ix-xiv
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  1. Introduction
  2. pp. 1-13
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  1. Chapter One. Her Mother Did Not Like to Have Her Learn to Work: Disability, Family, and the Spectrum of Productivity, 1840s–1870s
  2. pp. 14-48
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  1. Chapter Two. He Had No Home but the County Poor House: Family Incapacity, Charity Policy, Wage Labor, and the Shift to Custodial Care, 1870s–1900s
  2. pp. 49-90
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  1. Chapter Three. I Wish to Thank You for My Freedom: Paroling Feeble-Minded People into Farm and Domestic Work, 1900s–1930s
  2. pp. 91-110
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  1. Chapter Four. We Do Not Prefer Cripples, but They Can Earn Full Wages: Mechanization, Efficiency, and the Quest for Interchangeable Workers, 1880s–1920s
  2. pp. 111-136
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  1. Chapter Five. The Greatest Handicap Suffered by Crippled Workers: The Perverse Impact of Workmen’s Compensation, 1900s–1930s
  2. pp. 137-171
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  1. Chapter Six. Saving the Human Wreckage Cast on the Industrial Scrap Heap: Goodwill Industries and the Imperative of Efficiency, 1890s–1920s
  2. pp. 172-189
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  1. Chapter Seven. The Duty to Make Himself a Useful, Self-Supporting Citizen: Disabled Veterans and the Limits of Vocational Rehabilitation, 1910s–1920s
  2. pp. 190-222
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  1. Conclusion
  2. pp. 223-228
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  1. Appendix. A Note on Sources
  2. pp. 229-232
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  1. Notes
  2. pp. 233-338
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  1. Bibliography
  2. pp. 339-368
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  1. Index
  2. pp. 369-383
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Additional Information

ISBN
9781469624914
Related ISBN
9781469630083
MARC Record
OCLC
972734280
Pages
398
Launched on MUSE
2017-03-02
Language
English
Open Access
No
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