In this Book

summary
How do we ensure security and, at the same time, safeguard civil liberties? The Open Society Paradox challenges the conventional wisdom of those on both sides of the debate—leaders who want unlimited authority and advocates who would sacrifice security for individual privacy protection. It offers a provocative alternative, suggesting that while the very openness of American society has left the United States vulnerable to today’s threats, only more of this quality will make the country safer and enhance its citizens’ freedom and mobility.Uniquely qualified to address these issues, Dennis Bailey argues that the solution is not to create a police state that restricts liberties but, paradoxically, to embrace greater openness. Through new technologies that engender transparency, including secure information, biometrics, surveillance, facial recognition, and data mining, society can remove the anonymity of the ill-intentioned while revitalizing the notions of trust and accountability and enhancing freedom for most Americans. He explores the impact of greater transparency on our lives, our relationships, and our liberties. The Open Society Paradox is a brave exploration of how to realign our traditional assumptions about privacy with a twenty-first-century concept of an open society.

Table of Contents

  1. Title Page, Copyright, Dedication
  2. pp. i-vi
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  1. Contents
  2. pp. vii-viii
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  1. Acknowledgments
  2. pp. ix-x
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  1. Part I. The Enemies of Open Society
  1. 1. Introduction: The Devil Has a Deal for You!
  2. pp. 3-10
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  1. 2. Not in My Backyard: The Threat from Terrorism
  2. pp. 11-25
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  1. 3. Publius Who? Anonymity in an Open Society
  2. pp. 26-38
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  1. 4. Will the Real John Doe Please Stand Up? A Warningabout Identity Theft
  2. pp. 39-52
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  1. Part II. Technologies of Openness
  2. pp. 53-54
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  1. 5. Your Papers Please: The Case for a Homeland ID
  2. pp. 55-74
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  1. 6. Smile, You’re on Candid Camera: The Case for Surveillance
  2. pp. 75-95
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  1. 7. There’s Gold in Them Thar Data: The Case for Information Analysis
  2. pp. 96-114
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  1. Part III. Revisiting Privacy in an Age of Terror
  2. pp. 115-116
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  1. 8. Life, Liberty, and the Pursuit of Privacy
  2. pp. 117-129
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  1. 9. Privacy Lost
  2. pp. 130-138
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  1. 10. Big Brother Is Watching You
  2. pp. 139-152
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  1. 11. Invasion of the Data Snatchers
  2. pp. 153-165
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  1. 12. Information Does Not Kill People; People Kill People
  2. pp. 166-178
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  1. Part IV. Conclusion
  1. 13. The Open Society of the Twenty-First Century
  2. pp. 181-206
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  1. Notes
  2. pp. 207-222
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  1. Index
  2. pp. 223-228
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  1. About the Author
  2. p. 229
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Additional Information

ISBN
9781612343112
Print ISBN
9781574889178
MARC Record
OCLC
1016855445
Pages
240
Launched on MUSE
2018-01-01
Language
English
Open Access
N
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