Title Page, Copyright, Dedication

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pp. i-vi

Contents

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pp. vii-viii

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Acknowledgments

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pp. ix-x

Special thanks to those who gave time or had an influence on this effort, including: Paul Rosenzweig, Solveig Singleton, Amitai Etzioni, Sonia Arrison, David Brin, Barbara Doyen, Aaron Plank, Garon Reeves, Randy Cronk, Wayne Reno, Charles Kimble, Ken Graetz, James Thurber...

Part I. The Enemies of Open Society

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1. Introduction: The Devil Has a Deal for You!

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pp. 3-10

In early 2000, when Khalid al-Mihdhar and Nawaf al-Hamzi moved into the Parkwood Apartments in San Diego’s Clairmont District in California, they appeared to be two ordinary Muslims trying their best to fit in and stake their claim to the American dream. A local Islamic...

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2. Not in My Backyard: The Threat from Terrorism

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pp. 11-25

It became clear to many people that after the 9/11 attacks, the United States was in a changed world, one with a new kind of threat and different brand of enemy. During the cold war, America had a clearly defined adversary in the Soviet Union and an unambiguous...

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3. Publius Who? Anonymity in an Open Society

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pp. 26-38

Anyone who has gone to a Halloween party dressed up in costume knows the scintillating delight of being able to hide one’s identity from others. There is a certain delectable pleasure in leaving the baggage of your past behind, avoiding the biases and stereotypes through...

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4. Will the Real John Doe Please Stand Up? A Warningabout Identity Theft

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pp. 39-52

Failures in the U.S. system of identification have caused identity theft to rise to the top of the list of the fastest growing crimes in America. Many people are familiar with the horror stories or have known a victim of identity theft. Take this example described at the U.S...

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Part II. Technologies of Openness

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pp. 53-54

After spending the last several chapters detailing some of the evidence for the developing risks of the twenty-first century, we shift our focus to what steps the United States might take in its defense. It’s clear that terrorists cloaked in anonymity are a dilemma for a country like America precisely because they take...

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5. Your Papers Please: The Case for a Homeland ID

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pp. 55-74

If the American public wants to win the war against terrorism, I suggest that eventually we are going to have to confront the issue of identification. Although few have been willing to admit it, the most glaring gap in the U.S. strategy against terrorists is the country’s insecure...

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6. Smile, You’re on Candid Camera: The Case for Surveillance

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pp. 75-95

Of all the trends from the technological revolution of the last several decades, the growth in surveillance has been one of the steadiest and most consistent. Ever since the early 1960s, when federal law mandated the use of video cameras in banks, surveillance in all its...

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7. There’s Gold in Them Thar Data: The Case for Information Analysis

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pp. 96-114

In combating an enemy that seeks to hide in the shadows and strike without warning, information becomes one of America’s most important defenses. Unfortunately, as experts have pointed out, many of the strategies developed by U.S. intelligence for collecting information...

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Part III. Revisiting Privacy in an Age of Terror

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pp. 115-116

In the twenty-first century, when rapidly developing technologies of openness will make it harder for terrorists to blend in with the crowd, we must assume that the glare of greater transparency will unveil elements of our own lives. Although reducing the threat of terrorism is a welcomed benefit, more openness...

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8. Life, Liberty, and the Pursuit of Privacy

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pp. 117-129

The tension that one finds in the process of democracy, where the proper balance between competing interests is continually calibrated, is clearly evident in the homeland security debate. Those favoring stronger security measures seek to grant the government enhanced...

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9. Privacy Lost

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pp. 130-138

The plethora of books that proclaim its death imply that privacy has been slowly wasting away over time. It is as if there once was a Garden of Eden of privacy, an unspoiled world that was free of prying eyes where people went about their daily life hidden in a shroud of anonymity...

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10. Big Brother Is Watching You

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pp. 139-152

Of all the so-called threats to privacy, none seem as ominous as Big Brother. It is hard to find a story on privacy these days without some mention of Big Brother lurking in the shadows, ready to seize someone’s civil liberties at a moment’s notice. Many of these references...

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11. Invasion of the Data Snatchers

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pp. 153-165

Just when one thought a world dealing with the threat of Big Brother couldn’t get any more frightening, enter the latest villain in the war against privacy, corporate America. Many individuals concerned about privacy suggest that the threat of corporations collecting...

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12. Information Does Not Kill People; People Kill People

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pp. 166-178

An underlying assumption in the privacy debate is that if personal data could be secured properly many of the worst threats to privacy would be a distant memory. Whether a privacy concern involves a case of medical records being revealed, financial information being stolen...

Part IV. Conclusion

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13. The Open Society of the Twenty-First Century

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pp. 181-206

We began this discussion by suggesting that the open society of the twenty-first century will have the best chance to remain vibrant, robust, and secure if it is willing to lower the walls that separate us and embrace greater transparency. Instead of a world where people...

Notes

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pp. 207-222

Index

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pp. 223-228

About the Author

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p. 229