Cover

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Title Page, Series Page, Copyright, Dedication

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pp. i-vi

Contents

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pp. vii-viii

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Acknowledgments

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pp. ix-xiv

The research and composition of this book were long and complex processes with contributions from colleagues, friends, and helpers distributed over a wide geographical area. Some of them may never know they are thanked in these pages, which seems fitting given the subject of this book...

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Introduction: Behold the Lightning Chained and Bound

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pp. 1-20

In 1876, an unknown scribe at the popular newspaper Harper’s Weekly welcomed all the nations of the world to the Centennial Exposition in Philadelphia’s Fairmount Park with a bit of verse celebrating the achievements of the modernizing United States. The poem stresses the relative...

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1. Between Materiality and Magic: Representing the Railroad and the Telegraph

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pp. 21-56

When Harper’s Weekly began production in 1857, the United States stood on the threshold of a new age as a team of engineers strove to lay a submarine telegraph cable between North America and the United Kingdom. By 1886, the cartoonist Thomas Nast could joke that the country was so...

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2. “Where Vulcan is the Presiding Genius”: John Ferguson Weir, Metallurgy, and the Alchemical Sublime

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pp. 57-89

John Ferguson Weir’s The Gun Foundry (1864–66) and its com-panion piece, Forging the Shaft (1866–68; figs. 13 and 14), completed within two years of one another, are some of the only industrial interiors painted in the United States before the twentieth century. In subject...

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3. Swords into Ploughshares: Reconstruction, Reconciliation, and Labor

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pp. 90-122

A poem by Charles D. Shanly, “After the War,” ran on the front page of the August 1865 issue of Harper’s New Monthly Magazine. An almost pastoral scene appears in the accompanying wood engraving: farmer and blacksmith greet each other with smiles in the latter’s modest shop (fig. 23). The...

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4. Sugar, Shipping, and Cityscapes: Mapping Systems in Thomas Moran’s Lower Manhattan from Communipaw, New Jersey

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pp. 123-154

Manhattan shimmers in the distance. On the middle shore, several large factories and their smokestacks loom almost in silhouette against the sky. Directly before our eyes lies a grayish wasteland of scrub grass, warehouses, and marshy inlets (fig. 35). In Thomas Moran’s 1880 painting...

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5. Managing Visions of Industry: The Managerial Eye

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pp. 155-192

Most of us cannot even imagine entering a slaughterhouse. The mere thought of the smells and sights, the squeals of dying pigs and the sounds of their bodies being disassembled, is enough to turn the stomachs of the majority of twenty-first-century readers. And yet in 1867, James Parton...

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6. Laziness and Civilization: Picturing Sites of Social Control

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pp. 193-226

During the years that managerial ideology was on the rise in American industry, it was also growing in the social realm. Perhaps it was building neither as quickly nor as powerfully, but nevertheless the language of efficiency and systems was restructuring social relations. How else to explain...

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Conclusion: Twentieth-Century Echoes

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pp. 227-236

Despite their vibrancy and relevance throughout the nineteenth century, the images in this book began to appear, by comparison, outdated and even obsolete by the turn of the century due to major changes in both illustration and the art world. To consider the afterlife of nineteenth-century...

Notes

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pp. 237-278

Index

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pp. 279-288

About the Author

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pp. 289-291

Back Cover

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