Cover

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Half Title, Series Page, Title Page, Copyright, Dedication

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Contents

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pp. vii-viii

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Foreword

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pp. ix-x

Of all the history courses taught on college campuses, historiography is one of the most challenging. The historiographic essays most often available are frequently too specialized for broad teaching and sometimes too rigorous for the average undergraduate student. ...

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Acknowledgments

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pp. xi-xii

I thank Brian D. McKnight and James S. Humphreys for asking me to contribute this book to their series, so too to editor Joyce Harrison at Kent State University Press. Joyce also did a superb job preparing the bibliography. ...

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Introduction

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pp. 1-11

Writing in 1935 in his brilliant and brooding Black Reconstruction, the African American historian, sociologist, and propagandist W. E. B. Du Bois lamented America’s post–Civil War Era as a missed opportunity to reconstruct the war-torn nation in deed as well as in word. “If the Reconstruction of the Southern states, from slavery to free labor, and from aristocracy to industrial democracy, ...

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1. Reconstruction Historiography: An Overview

John David Smith

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pp. 12-45

In 1901 Woodrow Wilson, then teaching political science at Princeton University, commented that after thirty years, the time was ripe to study the period of Reconstruction following the Civil War, “not as partisans, but as historians.” Although Reconstruction still remained an incendiary subject for many Americans, “like a banked fire, still hot and fiery within,” ...

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2. Presidential Reconstruction

Kevin Adams

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pp. 46-68

Formal studies of Presidential Reconstruction—that is, the period of federal Reconstruction policy that preceded the advent of Congressional or Radical Reconstruction in 1867—have been rare in recent years, a neglect that becomes especially clear when considering the series of impressive studies exploring Reconstruction’s final stages that appeared in the first decade of the twentieth-first century.1 ...

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3. Radical Reconstruction

Shepherd W. McKinley

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pp. 69-90

The historiography of Congressional, or as it is more popularly known, Radical, Reconstruction, has been a “dark and bloody ground” paralleling the arcs of race relations and politics in the United States.1 After Reconstruction’s end, the so-called Dunning School of historians, the students of Columbia University’s William A. Dunning, adopted the white South’s victimized voice, ...

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4. Reconstruction: Emancipation and Race

R. Blakeslee Gilpin

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pp. 91-111

In March 1913, W. E. B. Du Bois wrote a public letter to the soon-to-be-inaugurated twenty-eighth president of the United States, Woodrow Wilson. The election of 1912 represented the capstone of Southern Redemption and a symbolic deliverance from Reconstruction for Democrats in the former Confederacy. ...

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5. Reconstruction: National Politics, 1865–1877

Edward O. Frantz

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pp. 112-129

It was once easy to disparage national politics during the Reconstruction Era. Whether one was a southerner or a northerner, a liberal or a conservative, many a historian looked at the political era spanning from 1865 to 1877 with disdain. Corruption, scandal, terror, and pettiness supposedly characterized the era, ...

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6. Reconstruction: Gender and Labor

J. Vincent Lowery

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pp. 130-150

Historians have always described the transition from slavery to free labor in the South as a difficult process. Historiographical debates have turned on assessments of freedpeople’s struggle for autonomy, planters’ determination to preserve some semblance of the old order, and the intent of northern Republicans and government agents. ...

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7. Reconstruction: Intellectual Life and Historical Memory

K. Stephen Prince

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pp. 151-170

Since the early twentieth century, political and social methodologies have dominated the historiography of Reconstruction. The first generations of scholarship on the period—notably the work of the Dunning School—focused almost exclusively on the electoral and legislative history of the postwar era. ...

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8. Reconstruction: Transnational History

Andrew Zimmerman

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pp. 171-196

Among the most important periods in U.S. history, Reconstruction might appear too narrowly national to reward an international approach.1 But viewed from such a perspective, Reconstruction appears as a particularly influential instance in a number of interrelated worldwide processes of the nineteenth century.

Bibliography

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pp. 197-224

Contributors

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pp. 225-226

Index

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pp. 227-243