Cover

pdf iconDownload PDF
 

Title Page, Copyright, Dedication

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. i-vi

Contents

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. vii-viii

List of Illustrations

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. ix-x

read more

Introduction

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. xi-xvi

“The tourist archipelagoes of my South / are prisons, too, corruptible,” writes the poet Derek Walcott. He refers to the actual archipelagoes of the Caribbean. But his South and mine share that in common, imprisoned in an inherited corruption. The tourists who visit, and indeed, too many of...

read more

1. The Ethic of Subsistence and the Origins of Southern Secession

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 1-27

In the spring of 1984, the legislature of Maryland undertook to modify the words of the state’s famous anthem, “Maryland, My Maryland,” written in the far more passionate spring of 1861 by James Ryder Randall. Enraged by the violence that had surrounded General Benjamin Butler’s efforts in...

read more

2. Fiscal Policy and the Failure of Radical Reconstruction in the Lower South

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 28-70

One of the most pernicious difficulties afflicting the historiography of Reconstruction is that few historians of Reconstruction have done much research on the antebellum period that preceded it. White Southern voters who judged Reconstruction policies at the polls viewed those policies from...

read more

3. Alabama’s Presidential Reconstruction Legislature

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 71-91

The South’s Presidential Reconstruction state legislatures have not had a good press. Suspicious Radical Republicans at the time thought them dominated by the former slavocracy and secessionists. The Black Codes a number of them enacted seemed to Radicals—and not without good reason...

read more

4. Alabama Emancipation in the Courts

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 92-109

There could not have been much suspense about the action that Alabama’s Constitutional Convention of 1865 would take on emancipation. Everyone who registered to vote in the August 31 election of the convention’s delegates had been required to swear to “abide by and faithfully support all...

read more

5. Redemption and the Jews in Montgomery

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 110-122

During the two hundred years of its history, Montgomery, Alabama, has had only two Jewish mayors. One was a Republican, Henry E. Faber, who served from 1870 to 1875, and the other was a Democrat, Mordecai L. Moses, who served from 1875 to 1881. The Jewish identity of the two men, their...

read more

6. Senator J. Thomas Heflin and the Expulsion Movement of 1929

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 123-147

The fall of the Redeemers from power in Alabama after the turn of the century was more a voluntary than a forced abdication. Ever pragmatic in their approach to politics, the majority of the Redeemer elite took the lesson of the Populist period to heart. Without the black vote, they could not...

read more

7. Hugo Black and the Golden Age

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 148-163

The sheer variety of twentieth-century southern political figures who at one time or another have been called Populists must give the historian pause. Jimmy Carter, George Wallace, James Folsom, Eugene Talmadge, Strom Thurmond, Theodore Bilbo, Huey Long, Orval Faubus, Ross Barnett...

read more

8. The Structure of White Supremacy in Alabama in the Era of World War II

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 164-185

On September 6, 1944, Walton H. Craft, a sixty-five-year-old white resident of Mobile, dispatched a letter of complaint to Alabama’s governor, Chauncey Sparks. Craft had come to Mobile in early 1942 to take a job at the city’s booming Brookley Air Force Base, and each day he rode a city bus...

read more

9. Rosa Parks and the Law

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 186-198

Racial segregation first came to public transportation in Montgomery, Alabama, in the summer of 1900. There had been a racial incident on a streetcar in Augusta, Georgia, in May of that year. A black man had killed a prominent young white man there in the course of an altercation over a seat. As...

read more

10. The Montgomery Freedom Rider Riots of 1961

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 199-215

The election of a racial liberal to the Montgomery City Commission in 1953, and his persuasion of his two colleagues on the commission—both of whom were fairly moderate on racial questions—to accept the hiring of black policemen in the spring of 1954, precipitated a political crisis in...

read more

Conclusion

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 216-220

My comments at the end of the preceding essay may perhaps leave the reader with the impression that I think synthesis in history is impossible, or at least unhelpful. Quite the contrary; it is my hope that the bringing of these articles together may offer synthetic possibilities. To clarify this point...

Index

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 221-230