Half Title, Series Page, Title Page, Copyright

pdf iconDownload PDF
 

Contents

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. v-vi

read more

Preface

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. vii-x

This book emerged from our work as codirectors of the Delphi Project on the Changing Faculty and Student Success. This national project has partnered with more than forty higher education organizations representing diverse stakeholders to examine issues related to the changing composition of the faculty and its impact on student learning and the mission of higher education, ...

read more

Acknowledgments

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. xi-xii

We would first like to express our gratitude to Susan Albertine, Caryn McTighe Musil, and the Association of American Colleges and Universities (AAC&U) for their partnership with the Delphi Project since its inception. AAC&U has provided exceptional leadership in advancing a thoughtful dialogue about the future of the faculty and helping shape the course of change. ...

Part One. The Context for a New Faculty Model

read more

1. The Current Context for Faculty Work in Higher Education. Understanding the Forces Affecting Higher Education and the Changing Faculty

Daniel Maxey, Adrianna Kezar

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 3-22

For nearly a hundred years, the dominant or “traditional” model of the faculty has been represented by full-time, tenure-track professors focused on a triad of responsibilities: for teaching, research, and service (Finkelstein and Schuster 2011; Kezar 2013). However, changes that have been afoot for several decades have begun to alter the essential nature of the professoriate and will continue to do so for the foreseeable future (Kezar and Sam 2010; Plater 1998). ...

read more

2. Recognizing the Need for a New Faculty Model

Adrianna Kezar, Daniel Maxey

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 23-42

In the previous chapter we described a variety of external changes and pressures that suggest we need to reconsider the faculty model. In this chapter, we explore why faculty matter to student success to provide a rationale for why going through the difficult work of creating new models is so important. ...

Part Two. Ideas for a New Faculty Model

read more

3. An Emerging Consensus about New Faculty Roles. Results of a National Study of Higher Education Stakeholders

Adrianna Kezar, Elizabeth Holcombe, Daniel Maxey

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 45-57

One of the reasons why new faculty models have not emerged is that there has been little discussion or perceived agreement about what future faculty roles might be. To exacerbate these problems, stereotypes that different stakeholder groups have of each other often prevent meaningful discussion. ...

read more

4. Core Principles for Faculty Models and the Importance of Community

Ann E. Austin, Andrea G. Trice

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 58-80

For anyone who is looking for challenge and opportunity, higher education is the place to be in the early decades of the twenty-first century. A long list of forces and factors are pressing on higher education institutions and transforming the nature of academic work. These include demands from societal stakeholders for heightened accountability and productivity, ...

read more

5. The Anatomy and Physiology of Medical School Faculty Career Models

William T. Mallon

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 81-100

The nation’s MD-granting medical schools, many of which are affiliated with the largest research universities in the United States, have been in the vanguard of innovative pathways of faculty appointment and promotion for more than thirty years. These institutions have developed multiple career pathways that emphasize differentiated roles, permit flexibility, and reward contributions using a broadened definition of scholarship. ...

read more

6. Students Speak about Faculty. What Students Need, What They Want, and What Helps Them Succeed

Arleen Arnsparger, Joanna Drivalas

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 101-116

Student voices are a valuable source of information about future faculty roles.1 In fifteen years of conducting focus groups with college students throughout the country, the first author of this chapter has observed thematic consistencies regarding what students want from the faculty at their colleges. ...

read more

7. Faculty as Learners. The New Faculty Role through the Lens of Faculty Development

Malcolm Brown

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 117-129

Higher education is frequently castigated for being impervious to change. Certainly nobody would mistake the tempo of change at a college or university for that at a Silicon Valley start-up. Nevertheless, changes are afoot in higher education with respect to its teaching and learning mission, and this is clearly visible with respect to faculty roles in teaching and learning and to the development and engagement support they receive. ...

read more

8. More Than a Zero-Sum Game. Shared Work Agreements

Kerryann O’meara, Lauren DeCrosta

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 130-142

Each of these reforms involves a change in organizational practices to balance faculty and institutional needs and goals. Each requires the faculty member and the institution to compromise on some benefit, norm, or expectation to succeed. ...

read more

9. A New Paradigm for Faculty Work and Evaluation

Richard Alan Gillman, Nancy Hensel, David A. Salomon

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 143-156

A universitywide commitment to student learning is the most productive way to address contemporary concerns about the value of higher education in an environment of increasing costs and limited employment opportunities for graduates. To facilitate the shift from a primarily individualistic approach to a community-based approach to faculty work, a new model for faculty work and evaluation is needed—one that places student learning at the center. ...

read more

10. Internationalization and Faculty Work

William Plater

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 157-172

A new ecosystem for institutions offering higher education, a transformed labor market model for tertiary education staffing, and a globally flatter higher education interconnected system—these are but a few of the predictions implying that faculty work will change significantly in response to internationalization, globalization, and glocalization, all of which are accelerated by the changing technologies that make the world smaller. ...

read more

11. The Future of Faculty Work. Academic Freedom and Democratic Engagement

R. Eugene Rice

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 173-191

By the 1980s, it was widely acknowledged that there was a dramatic mismatch between faculty priorities and the primary institutional missions of American colleges and universities. As early as 1983, Ernest Lynton, a distinguished physicist and the provost at Rutgers University, drew our attention to the “crisis of purpose” in our institutions of higher education. ...

read more

12. Aspirations and Inclinations among Emerging and Early-Career Faculty Members. Leveraging Strengths, Imagining Possibilities

Leslie D. Gonzales, Aimee LaPointe Terosky

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 192-203

For several years, policy and economic leaders as well as prominent media figures have accused faculty members of not focusing enough on teaching and student learning and of being distracted by futile research that lacks real-world application (Allen and Seaman 2011 and 2013; Conrad 2004; Maier 2012; McQuiggan 2012; Seaman 2009). ...

read more

13. Resonant Themes for a Professoriate Reconsidered. Consensus Points to Organize Efforts toward Change

Adrianna Kezar, Daniel Maxey

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 204-216

For the past several years, the Delphi Project on the Changing Faculty and Student Success has convened major stakeholder groups and thought leaders in higher education to take part in a dialogue about the need for collective effort to facilitate short- and long-term change in the professoriate. ...

About the Contributors

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 217-224

Index

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 225-226