Cover

pdf iconDownload PDF
 

Half title, Series info, Title page, Copyright

pdf iconDownload PDF
 

Table of Contents

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. v-viii

read more

Foreword: The History of the People’s Army

William J. Duiker

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. ix-xvi

In the quarter of a century that has elapsed since the fall of Saigon, the performance of the U.S. armed forces in the Vietnam War has been exposed to exhaustive, and often critical, analysis. Relatively little attention has been paid, at least in the United States, to the victors. Although a few scholarly studies have focused on the origins and the buildup of the North Vietnamese army (formally known as the People’s Army of Vietnam, or PAVN), ...

read more

Translator’s Preface

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. xvi-xx

In 1968, faced with the prospect of a two-year commitment to a new job as a file clerk deep in the bowels of the CIA Headquarters Building at Langley, I volunteered for the only assignment with sufficient priority to free me from my desperately boring existence: training as a Vietnamese-language interpreter/ translator for assignment to Saigon Station. ...

List of Terminology

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. xxi-xxiv

read more

Introduction

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. xxv-xxvi

Following the 1974 publication of History of the People’s Army of Vietnam, Volume I, Volume II of History of the People’s Army of Vietnam was presented to our readers on the 45th anniversary of the formation of the People’s Army and the 100th birthday of Chairman Ho Chi Minh. Because it was so thick, in this initial printing Volume II of History of the People’s Army of Vietnam was published as two books. ...

Part I. Building the People’s Army into a Regular, Modern Armed Force: Maintaining and Developing Revolutionary Armed Forces in the South, 1954–1960

read more

1. Urgently Reorganizing Our Forces: Preparations to Deal with a New Enemy

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 3-19

Our victory in the resistance war against the French colonialists and the intervention of the United States marked the beginning of a new phase in the development of the Vietnamese Revolution. ...

read more

2. The People’s Army Begins to Build a Modern, Regular Army: Maintaining Our Armed Teams in South Vietnam

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 20-48

Beginning in 1957, the revolutionary struggles of our people in the North and the South underwent a number of changes. In the North work on the economic recovery plan had been basically completed. Our work to correct errors made in the implementation of the land reform program had produced good results. ...

read more

3. The Development of Our Armed Forces during the General Uprising Movement: The Birth of Transportation Group 559

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 49-70

Faced with the steadily growing strength of the people’s struggle movement in South Vietnam, in March 1959 Ngo Dinh Diem’s puppet regime proclaimed that a state of war existed in South Vietnam. The regime switched part of its regular armed forces from mobile reserve duties to “territorial security” duties and ordered regular regiments and divisions to work with local forces in conducting sweeps in every region. ...

Part II. Intensifying the Work of Building a Modern, Regular Army, Expanding Our Massed Forces in South Vietnam, and Defeating the “Special Warfare” Strategy of the American Imperialists, 1961–1965

read more

4. Developing Forces, Building a Battle Posture, and Preparing for a New Struggle

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 73-90

In September 1960 the 3rd National Party Congress was held in Hanoi. After five years of work, our people in North Vietnam had completed the plan to rebuild and reform our economy and had begun to implement our five-year plan to build the technical and material structures of socialism. ...

read more

5. Increasing the Combat Strength of Our Main Force Mobile Troops and Developing Our Massed Troops on the Battlefields of South Vietnam

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 91-122

The development of simultaneous uprisings into revolutionary warfare in South Vietnam and the transition of the Laotian revolution into an armed struggle combined with a political struggle were important events that profoundly influenced the overall state of the revolutionary struggle on the Indochinese Peninsula. ...

read more

6. Intensifying Massed Combat Operations: Fighting alongside the Entire Population to Defeat the American Imperialist “Special War” Strategy 123

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 123-150

During the final months of 1963, Vietnam became an increasingly difficult problem for the U.S. ruling clique. After the coup that overthrew Ngo Dinh Diem, the political situation in Saigon remained unsettled and “revolutionary forces made very rapid progress . . . controlling a very large percentage of the population in a number of key provinces.”1 ...

Part III. The People’s Army of Vietnam Simultaneously Fights and Conducts Force Building and, Together with the Entire Population, Defeats the “Limited Warfare” Strategy of the American Imperialists, 1965–1968

read more

7. Rapidly Expanding Our Forces and Continuing the Offensive: Initial Victories over the Americans

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 153-172

After the Ap Bac victory in January 1963, our People’s War against the Americans to save the nation expanded rapidly. Our great, successive victories at Binh Gia, Ba Gia, and Dong Xoai, the high tide of insurrection that secured and expanded the power of the people in the rural lowlands and in the mountains, ...

read more

8. Increasing Our Combat Power: Defeating the American Expeditionary Army in South Vietnam and the American Air Force in North Vietnam

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 173-205

Our army’s victories in its initial battles against the American expeditionary army in South Vietnam and against American air forces in North Vietnam during 1965 solidified our confidence in the ability of the soldiers and civilians of our entire nation to defeat the American aggressors. ...

read more

9. The People’s Army, Together with the Entire Population, Conducts the General Offensive and Uprising of Tet 1968

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 206-233

By defeating two successive counteroffensives by the American imperialists in South Vietnam and defeating their war of destruction against North Vietnam, our soldiers and civilians had, to a significant extent at least, defeated the U.S. “limited war” strategy. In South Vietnam our army continued to hold and exploit the strategic initiative. ...

Part IV. The People’s Army of Vietnam Launches Large-Scale Combined-Arms Operations and, Together with the Entire Population, Partially Defeats the U.S. Imperialists’ Strategy to “Vietnamize” the War, 1969–1972

read more

10. Maintaining Our Main Force Elements in South Vietnam, Conducting Counterattacks and Offensives, and Developing a New Strategic Posture

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 237-257

The Tet 1968 General Offensive and simultaneous uprising by our soldiers and civilians won a strategic victory, defeated the aggressive plans of the U.S. imperialists, and created a strategic turning point in the war. The U.S. “limited war” had been bankrupted and the U.S. imperialists were forced to deescalate and alter their strategy. ...

read more

11. Increasing Our Ability to Conduct Combined-Arms Operations and Intensifying Counterattacks and Offensives in the Three Nations of Indochina, 1970–1971

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 258-282

As a result of our new victories on the battlefields of Cambodia and Laos, the nature of the war in all three Indochinese nations underwent important changes. In North Vietnam, taking advantage of the fact that our enemy had been forced to cease his bombing attacks, our people redoubled their efforts to rebuild the economy, consolidate national defense, ...

read more

12. The People’s Army, Local Armed Forces, and the Entire Population Launch the 1972 Strategic Offensive and Defeat the Enemy’s Second War of Destruction against North Vietnam

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 283-310

The strategic victories of the armies and peoples of the three nations of Indochina during the spring-summer 1971 period brought about important changes in the character of the war. The American imperialist “Vietnamization” policy had suffered a severe defeat. On the battlefields of South Vietnam the Americans and their puppets were forced to shift to an entirely defensive posture, ...

read more

13. Air Defense and Air Force Units Conduct an Anti-Aircraft Campaign: Defeating the B-52 Strategic Bombing Raids Conducted by the American Imperialists

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 311-330

As a result of the enormous victories won by our army and our people during the strategic offensive in South Vietnam and the battle against the American imperialist second war of destruction in the North, the nature of the war changed in many important ways. In South Vietnam our liberated area expanded and linked up with the great rear area in the North. ...

Part V. The Formation of Strategic Army Corps: The Entire Nation Urgently Prepares and Launches the Spring 1975 General Offensive and Uprising, Bringing the Resistance War against the United States to Save the Nation to a Victorious Conclusion, 1973–1975

read more

14. Developing Mobile Main Force Corps-Sized Units, Combating Enemy Efforts to Capture Our Territory, Creating a New Battlefield Posture, and Preparing for the General Offensive and Uprising

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 333-360

The Paris Agreement to “End the War and Reestablish Peace in Vietnam,” signed on 27 January 1973, was a great victory for our people and a major defeat for the American imperialists and their lackeys. The agreement forced the U.S. imperialists to end their war of aggression in Vietnam; withdraw all U.S. and satellite troops from South Vietnam; ...

read more

15. Striking with Combined-Arms Power: Seizing the City of Ban Me Thuot, Liberating the Central Highlands, and Opening the Way for the Spring 1975 General Offensive and Uprising

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 361-377

In September 1974 the Politburo and the Central Military Party Committee decided to launch an offensive campaign in the southern portion of the Central Highlands and directed the General Staff to prepare a plan for this offensive. Both the Politburo decision and the campaign plan were revised in November 1974. ...

read more

16. Seizing the Opportunity: The Armed Forces of Military Region Tri-Thien, Military Region 5, and 2nd Corps Coordinate Attacks to Liberate Hue, Danang, and the Provinces of Central Vietnam

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 378-395

The two-year 1975–1976 combat plan described Tri-Thien and Region 5 as important strategic theaters1 that were to conduct operations in coordination with the main strategic theater, the Central Highlands. ...

read more

17. The Ho Chi Minh Campaign: The People’s Army and the Entire Nation Fight the Decisive Battle to Liberate Saigon and the Provinces of Cochin China, Bringing the War against America to Save the Nation to a Glorious Conclusion

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 396-427

The victories of our Central Highlands and Hue-Danang Campaigns signaled a new level of maturity for our army in all aspects of its operations. Our main force units had gained a great deal of experience in the organization and command of combined-arms operations during large-scale campaigns. The combat strength of our large main force units had increased markedly. ...

read more

Conclusion

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 428-450

With the victory of the 1953–1954 winter-spring strategic offensive, the high point of which was the Dien Bien Phu campaign, our soldiers and civilians brought to an end the resistance war against the French colonialist aggressors and liberated North Vietnam. The struggle to liberate South Vietnam and unify the nation, however, still continued. ...

Notes

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 451-476

Index

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 477-494

Back Cover

pdf iconDownload PDF