Cover

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Title Page, Copyright

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pp. i-iv

Contents

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pp. v-vi

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Preface

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pp. vii-ix

The title of this book calls attention to significant shifts in the debate about and the use of Critical Theory. Since about 1980, not only the parameters but also the character of the discussion have changed. Before that, by and large, the Frankfurt School and Critical Theory were perceived as part of the larger project...

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Introduction: Marx, the Frankfurt School, and West German History

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pp. 1-20

Before 1970 the term "Critical Theory," if used at all in this country, referred to the works of the Frankfurt School, that is, to the writings of Max Horkheimer and Theodor W. Adorno, Herbert Marcuse, and Leo Lowenthal. More recently, the name of Jürgen Habermas has been added...

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1. Neoromantic Anticapitalism: Georg Lukács's Search for Authentic Culture

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pp. 21-52

In the more recent research on romanticism, Georg Lukács enjoys a reputation as a dogmatic and obstinate opponent of romantic literature. This view is certainly not without justification, for his essays of the 1930s and 1940s on authors such as Heinrich von Kleist and E. T. A. Hoffmann, as well as his...

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2. Art Work and Modernity: The Legacy of Georg Lukács

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pp. 53-74

The debate between Georg Lukács and the Frankfurt School after the Second World War did not occur in a climate of mutual understanding. Even before they left Germany in 1933-Lukács emigrating to the Soviet Union and most of the members of the Frankfurt School...

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3. Autonomy of Art: Looking Back at Adorno's Aesthetische Theorie

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pp. 75-98

Theodor W. Adomo's major contribution to the philosophy of art, his Aesthetische Theorie, appeared in 1970.1 The work was almost completed when the author died in 1969. Adorno meant to rewrite the introduction, but otherwise the text needed only stylistic revisions, which were carried out...

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4. Dialectic of Enlightenment Revisited: Habermas's Critique of the Frankfurt School

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pp. 99-130

A well-known newspaper caricature, printed some twenty years ago, pictures the Frankfurt School as a closely knit group with Max Horkheimer as a large father figure watching over the other members of the school, among them Theodor W. Adorno and Jürgen Habermas. This view...

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5. Habermas's Philosophical Discourse of Modernity

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pp. 131-155

In September 1980, when he accepted the Adorno Prize from the city of Frankfurt, Jürgen Habermas provoked his audience by insisting that the discourse of modernity, which supposedly had collapsed, was by no means obsolete¡ moreover, he stressed that it was still waiting for its ultimate...

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6. The Politicization of Aesthetic Theory: The Debate in Aesthetics since 1965

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pp. 156-197

In West Germany the politicization of aesthetic theory and literary criticism began during the second half of the 1960s. If one were to describe everything that took place in the fifteen years between 1965 and 1979, the resulting recitation of names and projects would contribute...

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7. Reappraisals of Critical Theory: The Legacy of the Frankfurt School in America

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pp. 198-228

The participants in any discussion about Critical Theory in the United States have to keep in mind that Critical Theory is not identical with the Frankfurt School, at least not with the work of Horkheimer and Adorno or their disciples in postwar Germany. In this country, Critical Theory...

Index

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pp. 229-247