In this Book

summary
The number of bicyclists is increasing in the United States, especially among the working class and people of color. In contrast to the demographics of bicyclists in the United States, advocacy for bicycling has focused mainly on the interests of white upwardly mobile bicyclists, leading to neighborhood conflicts and accusations of racist planning.

In Bike Lanes Are White Lanes, scholar Melody L. Hoffmann argues that the bicycle has varied cultural meaning as a “rolling signifier.” That is, the bicycle’s meaning changes in different spaces, with different people, and in different cultures. The rolling signification of the bicycle contributes to building community, influences gentrifying urban planning, and upholds systemic race and class barriers.

In this study of three prominent U.S. cities—Milwaukee, Portland, and Minneapolis—Hoffmann examines how the burgeoning popularity of urban bicycling is trailed by systemic issues of racism, classism, and displacement. From a pro-cycling perspective, Bike Lanes Are White Lanes highlights many problematic aspects of urban bicycling culture and its advocacy as well as positive examples of people trying earnestly to bring their community together through bicycling.
             
 
 

Table of Contents

  1. Cover
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  1. Half title, Title Page, Copyright, Dedication
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  1. Contents
  2. pp. vii-viii
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  1. Acknowledgments
  2. pp. ix-xii
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  1. 1. One Less Car, One More Critique: U.S. Urban Bicycle Culture and Advocacy
  2. pp. 1-50
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  1. 2. More Races, Less Racing: The Role of a Bicycle Race in Community Building
  2. pp. 51-80
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  1. 3. Bike Lanes Are White Lanes: Gentrification and Historical Racism in Portland’s Bicycle Infrastructure Planning
  2. pp. 81-110
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  1. 4. Recruiting People Like You: Class-Based Recruitment and Bicycle Advocacy in Minneapolis
  2. pp. 111-142
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  1. 5. The Beginning of the Equity Era: Possibilities and Solutions
  2. pp. 143-160
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  1. Notes
  2. pp. 161-182
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  1. Bibliography
  2. pp. 183-192
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  1. Index
  2. pp. 193-196
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Additional Information

ISBN
9780803288225
Related ISBN
9780803276789
MARC Record
OCLC
936433444
Pages
208
Launched on MUSE
2016-05-22
Language
English
Open Access
No
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