Cover

pdf iconDownload PDF

p. 1

Half title, Series editor, Title page, Copyright

pdf iconDownload PDF
 

Contents

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. v-vi

read more

Acknowledgments

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. vii-viii

This book was made possible by the support and enthusiasm of family members, friends, colleagues, and institutions whose backing over a four-year period was essential to completing the work. The editors would like to thank the US agency for International development for supporting the original study group, whose essays formed the basis for the book, ...

Note on Transliteration

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. ix-x

read more

Introduction: Politics of Contention and Conciliation in Iran’s Semiautocracy

Daniel Brumberg, Farideh Farhi

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 1-34

Two signal events bracket this extraordinary collection of essays on political and social change in contemporary Iran. The first was the hotly contested reelection of Mahmud Ahmadinejad in June 2009, and the second was the surprise election of Hassan Rouhani to the presidency in June 2013. ...

Part I. The Contested Terrain

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 35-36

read more

1. Factionalism, Privatization, and the Political Economy of Regime Transformation

Payam Mohseni

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 37-69

The contested Iranian presidential election of 2009—which ignited the most serious challenge to the authority of the Islamic Republic since the revolution— seemed to be a turning point in Iranian politics. The violent repression of the Green Movement by the coercive forces of the state and the timely inauguration of President Mahmud Ahmadinejad to his second term in the presidency were ominous signs of a closing of the Iranian regime ...

read more

2. Social Welfare Policies and the Dynamics of Elite and Popular Contention

Kevan Harris

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 70-100

Trying to understand politics in the Islamic Republic of Iran customarily involves ritual poring over of a bewildering list of names, associations, and factions that make up the country’s elite. Stories about the exercise of power pit one group against another, or more often, one personality against another. ...

read more

3. Education as Public Good or Private Resource: Accommodation and Demobilization in Iran’s University System

Shervin Malekzadeh

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 101-132

Acts of intimidation and formal warning filled the month of June as authorities in Iran scrambled to contain the unexpected mobilization of millions of young people during the buildup to the 2009 presidential elections in Iran. For weeks, the streets of Tehran and other major cities had been filled with spontaneous but unauthorized rallies by partisans of all political stripes, proclaiming the virtues of their candidates. ...

Part II. Institutional Evolution

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 133-134

read more

4. The Office of the Supreme Leader: Epicenter of a Theocracy

Mehrzad Boroujerdi, Kourosh Rahimkhani

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 135-165

As a theocratic state born through a popular revolution, the Islamic Republic of Iran (IRI) has exhibited both democratic and authoritarian features since its inception. The Supreme Leader is considered the epicenter of Iran’s theocratic authority structure and the ultimate arbiter of Iranian politics. ...

read more

5. Electoral Politics, Power, and Prospects for Reform

Yasmin Alem

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 166-192

In the year commemorating its thirtieth anniversary, the Islamic Republic faced its most imperiling political crisis. Elections, often referred to as one of the pillars of the system by its leadership, nearly became the cause of its undoing with the disputed reelection of incumbent president Mahmud Ahmadinejad bringing about eight months of protests. ...

Part III. Political and Ideological Challenges

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 193-194

read more

6. The Rule of Law and Conflict in the Reform Era

Mehrangiz Kar, Azadeh Pourzand

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 195-223

The inspiration for this chapter comes from a personal experience with the Iranian judicial system. One of us—Mehrangiz Kar—was arrested in 2000 upon her return to Iran after attending a conference in Berlin on the future of reform in Iran. She was taken to the third branch of the Islamic Revolutionary Court in Tehran. ...

read more

7. The Green Movement and Political Change in Iran

Fatemeh Haghighatjoo

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 224-250

The contested presidential election of June 2009 unleashed the most serious mass protest movement since the birth of the Islamic Republic of Iran in 1979. The widespread unrest throughout major urban areas gave birth to what came to be known as the Green Movement, whose minimal initial demand was epitomized in the simple but profound slogan, “Where is my vote?” ...

read more

8. “This Government Is Neither Islamic nor a Republic”: Responses to the 2009 Postelection Crackdown

Shadi Mokhtari

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 251-282

When faced with a crisis that threatens its survival, an authoritarian government often makes either knee-jerk or calculated decisions about whether heightened repression, “managed reform” according to limited concessions, or some combination of the two is more likely to sustain the life of the regime. ...

read more

Epilogue

Daniel Brumberg, Farideh Farhi

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 283-292

What does a collective assessment of these chapters tell us about the trajectory of Iran’s politics in the coming decade and beyond? Do they portend continued centralization, or prospects for a reopening of the political and social field? These are not, of course, either/or propositions. ...

Selected Bibliography

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 293-306

Contributors

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 307-308

Index

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 309-318