Cover

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Half title, Frontispiece, Title page, Copyright

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Contents

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pp. v-vi

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Preface

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pp. vii-xii

Ranger Baz Outlaw is an enigma. Academicians and aficionados focusing on the merits and/or misdeeds of nineteenth-century Texas Rangers are quite likely familiar with the name and may believe they know the man. And, perhaps, they do. ...

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Acknowledgments

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pp. xiii-xx

Baz Outlaw, his mind sometimes numbed by tarantula juice, fought hard to keep from going under—drowning—in that remorseless whiskey river of despair, hopelessness, and craziness. However, not everyone connected with living his story or telling his story sinks. ...

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1. A Magnetic Lone Star

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pp. 1-27

Lee County, due north of Albany, Georgia, was pleasantly sited in the southeastern section of what in due time would be nicknamed the Peach State. It was a part of the Old Plantation South. There the Alabama-born Meshack Napoleon Bonaparte Outlaw, subsequent to his 1847 graduation from the Medical College of New York City, upheld his medical practice as a country physician.1 ...

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2. Great Prudence and Good Judgment

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pp. 28-64

Candidly the phrase “gone to Texas” was applicable to an earlier time, but Baz Outlaw went: Straight to Guadalupe County.1 Honestly it may be reported there is—as of yet—no particular document placing Baz as a temporary resident in or near his uncle Y.P. Outlaw’s home, but the supposition is buttressed by a primary source. ...

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3. A Fighting Business—Robbing a Train

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pp. 65-90

Probably little did he know it then, but Private Baz Outlaw had been transferred into one of the more celebrated and active Frontier Battalion units, Company D. At the time he transitioned into his new headquarters the company was commanded by Captain Frank Jones, an utterly fearless Ranger who had come from the bottom tier, ...

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4. Making the Shoe Pinch Too Close

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pp. 91-120

The wheels had come off in Wharton County. Situated not too far southwest of Houston, Wharton County was/is perfectly suited for its deserved agribusiness productivity and heritage. Bisected by the Colorado River, bestowed with a lengthy growing season, blessed with abundant rainfall, and positioned but one county removed from the Texas Gulf Coast, ...

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5. One of the Worst and Most Dangerous

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pp. 121-145

By Christmas of 1888 the Company D camp alongside the Leona River, six miles from alluring Uvalde, had been reactivated.1 Private Baz Outlaw wasn’t allowed an overabundance of time for sitting around at Camp Leona stuffing himself with scrumptiously roasted wild turkey or wandering into Uvalde to sample any other delicious pleasures or whiffs of perfume the town might afford young men. ...

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6. Worth Two or Three Ordinary Men

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pp. 146-167

The attractions of work or dearth of work in Mexico had lost their luster for John R. Hughes. Some time on that first day of December 1889 and somewhere in Uvalde County he raised his hand swearing an oath to the State of Texas and was once more a Ranger, a private in Company D.1 ...

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7. Couldn’t Leave Liquor Alone

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pp. 168-193

Corporal John R. Hughes Seemed to have had the state of affairs along the Rio Grande pegged tight—and right—noting there had been “so much lawlessness at & near Presidio” that he thought it best to maintain a camp there for at least a month’s duration. ...

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8. Insulted in the Presence of Ladies

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pp. 194-222

During wee morning hours of September 2, 1891, at about four o’clock, the engineer on the westbound Galveston, Harrisburg & San Antonio (Southern Pacific) Railroad’s No. 20 noticed something unfamiliar and out of the ordinary—debris had been piled onto the railroad tracks. ...

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9. Simply Cannot Control Himself

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pp. 223-250

Assuredly the grim reaper had not been asleep during that first month of eighteen-hundred and ninety-two: Not in the Big Bend Country, Company D’s territory. Subsequent to slick undercover work, Diamond Dick St. Leon, the former-Ranger, had infiltrated and ingratiated himself with a nasty gang of Mexican ore thieves at Shafter. ...

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10. Undaunted Courage and Fine Generalship

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pp. 251-267

Springtime of 1893 had closed finding U.S. Deputy Marshal/Special Ranger Baz Outlaw sitting in a reasonably good position career-wise. Certainly, despite the intermittent drunken and messy imbroglios of the past, maybe his word about foregoing taking a drink would stand good. ...

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11. In Arrest When He Died

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pp. 268-290

The previous year may have been put to bed, but 1894 El Paso was wide awake, one of those emblematic towns of the popularized Wild West era that never slept. And if she did need to nap for a minute or two—or readjust unmentionables—well, Ciudad Juárez was across the river. ...

Notes

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pp. 291-352

Bibliography

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pp. 353-364

Index

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pp. 365-373