Cover

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Title Page, Copyright, Dedication

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pp. i-vi

Contents

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pp. vii-viii

Figures

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pp. ix-x

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Acknowledgments

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pp. xi-xvi

The book emerges at last from its long travels. I would not have been able to write what follows without the extraordinary generosity of so many people. The words I offer you are insufficient. They cannot capture all the time and work you have given to this book, and they cannot express my profound gratitude. I nevertheless...

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Introduction

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pp. 1-18

In January 2002, the U.S. naval base at Guantánamo Bay received its first so-called enemy combatants—detainees of the War on Terror. Five months later, one of those inmates, Nizar Sassi, defined his new surroundings as a place where “you don’t have the right to have rights.”1 He was neither making...

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Part I

On 14 February 1942, two months after Japanese forces attacked Pearl Harbor and the United States officially entered the Second World War, President Franklin D. Roosevelt signed Executive Order 9066, authorizing the mass evacuation and imprisonment of all ethnic Japanese persons living on the West Coast...

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1. Internment Remains: The 1988 Civil Liberties Act and Racism Re-Formed

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pp. 21-56

On 10 August 1988, President Ronald Reagan signed into law the Civil Liberties Act, which granted redress to the ethnic Japanese men and women who had been relocated and interned without due process during World War II. Removed to the camp, they had been severed from the political community...

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2. Residues of Rightlessness: Ghosts and the Afterlife of Internment

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pp. 57-84

The hope of redress is that it will create closure. Those interned during World War II, and their relatives, hoped that the redress movement would ease the pain of those years and provide some measure of resolution. Members of the Commission on Wartime Relocation and Internment of Civilians, and those politicians...

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Part II

On 30 September 1991, Jean-Bertrand Aristide, the recently elected president of Haiti, was overthrown in a military coup d’état. Violent repression followed; thousands of his supporters soon fled, crossing the border into the Dominican Republic or taking small boats into the open waters. The U.S. Coast Guard...

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3. Just to Stay Alive: Haitian Refugees and Guantánamo’s Carceral Quarantine

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pp. 87-113

The Haitians who fled their country following the 1991 overthrow of President Jean-Bertrand Aristide landed at Guantánamo as a last resort. Though the U.S. executive branch quickly sought to interdict and return the refugees, federal courts temporarily prohibited it from this immediate, forcible...

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4. Not a Place to Live: Resisting Rightlessness through Word and Body

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pp. 114-150

By the time he spoke these words, Elma Verdieu had not eaten in three weeks. He and the other HIV-positive refugees remained imprisoned at Guantánamo’s Camp Bulkeley, with no idea when they would leave its confines or what fate would ultimately befall them. But they refused to waste away...

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Part III

On 11 January 2002, exactly four months after the terrorist attacks of September 11, and following the military invasion of Afghanistan, a cargo plane arrived at the Guantánamo Bay Naval Base. Military officers unloaded the cargo—twenty men wearing shackles and handcuffs, orange jumpsuits...

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5. Creating the Enemy Combatant: Performances of Justice and Realities of Rightlessness

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pp. 153-187

On 6 April 2006, the U.S. Department of Defense commenced military commission proceedings against Binyam Mohamed,1 a British resident arrested in Pakistan in 2002, imprisoned and tortured in Morocco and Afghanistan, and sent to Guantánamo in 2004.2 After years without a hearing...

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6. Living in a Dying Situation: Preserving Life at Guantánamo

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pp. 188-216

Adnan Farhan Abdul Latif spoke these words in the midst of a mass hunger strike that overtook Guantánamo in 2007.1 Although he expressed his desire to die and engaged in the strike for more than six months, starving himself to death was impossible. Twice each day, the camp’s guards and medical...

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Conclusion

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pp. 217-230

As I write in June 2015, what will happen next at Guantánamo is far from clear. President Barack Obama has intermittently expressed his desire to close the enemy combatant camp ever since he took office. He signed an executive order on 22 January 2009, two days after his inauguration, commanding...

Notes

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pp. 231-270

Bibliography

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pp. 271-292

Index

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pp. 293-313