Cover

pdf iconDownload PDF
 

Title Page, Frontispiece, Copyright

pdf iconDownload PDF
 

Contents

pdf iconDownload PDF
 

Illustrations and Tables

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. vii-viii

read more

Preface

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. ix-xx

If there is one constant in historical writing, it is revision. Each generation of writers brings its own perspectives and troubles to bear on the past, finds new material, and reinterprets old sources. The result is new understandings of old stories, new images and portraits, revised pictures of the past...

read more

Acknowledgments

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. xxi-xxii

A scholarly project that has spent as many years in gestation as this one owes far more intellectual debts than its author can ever fully acknowledge. To the many colleagues, friends, and institutions that I cannot enumerate here, you have my deepest gratitude.
Portions of the research for this...

read more

1. At the Dawn of Freedom

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 1-16

At the very dawn of freedom, well before the nation moved grudgingly toward formal emancipation, southern black slaves began to forge their own destiny. From the first days of freedom, through the displacements of war, and into Reconstruction, they pursued many...

read more

2. To Serve My Own People: Black Teachers in the Southern Black Schools

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 17-51

Richard H. Wells was born enslaved in Virginia but was sold to a Florida slave owner at some point before the Civil War. He was in his thirties when he and nearly 170 other slaves on James Kirksey’s properties were freed. Kirksey was a wealthy merchant in Tallahassee...

read more

3. It Will Result in a Better Understanding of Their Duties: Southern White Teachers and the Limits of Emancipation

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 52-77

In the spring of 1868, Josephine Stell applied to the Freedmen’s Bureau in Texas for a teaching position. To make her case, she explained, ‘‘I feel interested in the education of the freed people,—the more intelligent they become, the less trouble they will give to our country, and...

read more

4. A Desire to Labor in the Missionary Cause: Northern White Teachers and the Ambiguities of Emancipation

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 78-119

When the American Civil War began, Mary J. Mead was living alone in the quiet college town of Hillsdale, Michigan. In the previous decade she had been widowed by the death of her attorney husband and had lost her daughter, Ella. Her husband had left her...

read more

5. You Will, of Course, Wish to Know All about Our School: Learning and Teaching in the Freed People’s Schools

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 120-152

Those who worked with the freed people in their schools came from far more diverse backgrounds and carried far more divergent aims than writers have previous imagined. But what should we make of that? At one level of analysis, it should not have mattered whether the...

read more

6. Race, Reconstruction, and Redemption: The Fate of Emancipation and Education, 1861–1876

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 153-178

From slavery through Reconstruction and into Redemption, African Americans fought tenaciously for literacy. Enslaved blacks risked fearsome punishment to read and write;∞ at the dawn of freedom, the black quest for schooled knowledge flowered brilliantly. Even before...

read more

Appendix A: Teachers in the Freed People’s Schools, 1861–1876

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 179-183

The Freedmen’s Teacher Project is attempting to identify by name every teacher who worked in a school for the freed people between 1861 and 1876. Individuals are included in the database if they taught for at least one month and provided that they are identified by name, the year they taught, and at least the state in which...

read more

Appendix B: Estimating the Number of Black and Southern White Teachers, 1869–1876

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 184-188

As noted above, a significant number of southern whites taught in the southern black schools, roughly half as many as northern whites. A relatively small number of southern white teachers agreed to teach for, or were hired by, a northern aid agency. Significantly more were assisted by or agreed to report to the Freedmen’s...

Notes

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 189-246

Bibliography

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 247-300

Index

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 301-314