Cover

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Title Page Copyright Page

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Table of Contents

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p. vii

List of Maps

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p. ix

List of Photos

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p. xi

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Preface

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pp. xv-xix

It was a sunny morning, unusually warm for early June in Quebec, just across the border from Vermont. Brigadier General Henry M. Lazelle, US Army, Retired, stood on the porch of his rough-hewn log cabin and let the sun soak through his night shirt. He marveled once again at the beauty of the woods and...

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Acknowledgements

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pp. xxv-xxvi

This book is dedicated to my wife, Margaret Kress Carson, my constant companion, advisor, and reviewer, as I have worked on my greatgrandfather’s story. She has walked the grounds of forts and battlefields, plowed through volumes of research materials, and gently offered criticism and editorial advice. It is largely because of her support and encouragement that this project has been...

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Chapter 1: A Five-Year Man

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pp. 1-22

On a warm afternoon in early June 1850, Henry M. Lazell1 arrived at the Hudson River’s West Point landing on a steamboat from New York City. His first view of the Academy was from Highland Gorge. Some years earlier, another newly arrived cadet, Horatio G. Wright, remembered that he felt as if “the rugged granite walls

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Chapter 2: Operations Against the Apaches

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pp. 23-56

When Cadet Henry M. Lazelle graduated from the United States Military Academy and was commissioned a Brevet (Bvt) 2nd Lieutenant of Infantry, officers were appointed to specific positions, carrying a specific grade, in specific units (e.g. 2nd Lieutenant, B Company, 1st Infantry Regiment). Academy graduates went into...

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Chapter 3: From Prisoner of War to Prisoner Exchange Agent

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pp. 57-78

During the Bonneville Campaign in 1857, Lazelle had foreseen conflict between North and South over the issue of slavery. Like most New Englanders, he found slavery morally repugnant, writing in his journal in May 1857 that it exposed Americans to “the scorn and ridicule of enlightened Europe, and the pity of a civilized world...

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Chapter 4: Defending Washington

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pp. 79-124

On September 17, 1863, Lazelle wrote to Lieutenant Colonel Sprague, still New York State Adjutant General, accepting his appointment as colonel of the 16th New York Cavalry, noting that he assumed command “with hesitancy and a want of confidence—the Cavalry is not my forte— even if I have one.” Nonetheless, he assured...

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Chapter 5: The Pride of Mecklenburg County

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pp. 125-144

With his resignation from the New York volunteers, Lazelle once again was a captain of the 8th Infantry, awaiting orders to his next assignment. He and Rebecca were about to begin a nomadic life. On October 20, 1864, he reported to the Assistant Adjutant General of the Army that his temporary address would be at the Office of the Commissary General of Prisoners, in care of Col. W. Hoffman...

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Chapter 6: Indian Territory

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pp. 145-184

On July 5, 1872, Capt. Lazelle and his company, along with the regimental headquarters and five other companies, departed David’s Island, en route by rail to Sioux City, Iowa, arriving on July 9. From Sioux City, the regimental headquarters and band left for Omaha Barracks (Fort Omaha) on July 11. Lazelle and the...

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Chapter 7: West Point—A New Battleground

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pp. 185-218

Lazelle arrived at West Point in mid-June 1879, “assigned to duty as Commandant of Corps of Cadets, to take effect July 1, 1879,” and brevetted to the rank of lieutenant colonel. He would not be promoted to lieutenant colonel (23rd Infantry) permanently until a year later. As had his predecessors, he also served as Instructor...

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Chapter 8: A New Challenge—General Howard Takes Command

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pp. 219-238

General Howard arrived at West Point in January 1881, as the Whittaker court martial was getting under way. Although roommates their plebe year, he and Lazelle had had no contact during their respective Army careers. Nonetheless, Lazelle undoubtedly knew a good deal about his former classmate, given Howard’s reputedly poor performance as a corps commander at the battles of Chancellorsville...

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Chapter 9: First to Purgatory, Then to India

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pp. 239-260

Reassigned as lieutenant colonel of the 23rd Infantry Regiment, effective June 26, 1882,1 Lazelle remained at West Point until August 4. After spending time on leave, including the visit with the Barrows family in Canada, the family traveled to Fort Craig in December. Lazelle assumed command of the post on December 18. They...

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Chapter 10: Back to Washington and Controversy

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pp. 261-286

Lazelle’s family joined him in Vancouver, Washington, in the fall of 1886, moving into a large, two-story house on post with a wraparound porch. Perhaps in celebration or to show his family what his job entailed, Lazelle mounted an inspection of Vancouver Barracks, “quite unexpectedly to the troops.”1 Jacob...

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Chapter 11: Fort Clark, the 18th Infantry and Retirement

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pp. 287-310

Colonel Lazelle and his family joined the 18th Infantry Regiment on October 24, 1889. When the Lazelles arrived at Fort Clark, the 3rd Cavalry was still headquartered there and its colonel was post commander. During October and November, the Headquarters and companies of the 18th Infantry made their way from the Department of Missouri to their new assignment. The Field Staff and Band, along...

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Chapter 12: A Lost Soul

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pp. 311-328

According to Horace, his father was very much at loose ends upon his retirement. Once ensconced at the West Hotel in Minneapolis, he could not stay put for long. In January 1895, he headed south, first to Thomasville, Georgia, just north of the Florida border near Tallahassee, and eventually on to Jamaica where he whiled away his time fishing.1 In March, he was back in New....

Notes

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pp. 329-376

Bibliography

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pp. 377-394

Index

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pp. 395-399