Cover

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Title page, Series page, Copyright, Dedication

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Contents

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p. vii

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Introduction. North of Jefferson

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pp. 1-14

Historians and the wider public continue to be fascinated by Thomas Jefferson, who seems to embody a fundamental American contradiction. An advocate of republican government, principal author of the Declaration of Independence, and given at times to ideological musings that bordered on the anarchic, Jefferson also owned...

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Chapter 1. The Emancipation of New England

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pp. 15-49

In a letter to Elbridge Gerry of Massachusetts in 1801, Thomas Jefferson reached out in sympathy to an oppressed compatriot. “Your part of the Union tho’ as absolutely republican as ours,” said Jefferson, “had drunk deeper of the delusion [of Federalism], & is therefore slower in recovering from it. The aegis of government, & the temples of religion & of justice, have all been prostituted there to toll us back...

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Chapter 2. Philadelphia, Crossroads of Democracy

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pp. 50-93

Writing in Philadelphia’s in 1804, Thomas Paine defined the political novelty of Jeffersonian America. According to Paine, popular sovereignty and political equality made the United States home to a new type of man. Once they left Europe and its “hereditary potentates” behind, men began to consider “government and public affairs as part of their own concern,” and thereby “found...

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Chapter 3. Jeffersonians Go to Washington

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pp. 94-131

The election of 1800 marked a distinct shift in national political power, as the Democratic-Republicans took over the presidency and both houses of Congress. The Jeffersonian ascendancy was most obvious in the House of Representatives, arguably the most democratic branch of the federal government. Republicans moved from 43.4 percent...

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Chapter 4. The Idea of a Northern Party

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pp. 132-159

The Democratic-Republican party grew impressively after the election of 1800, and by Jefferson’s second term it was the dominant force in national politics. But success came with a price, as the relative decline of Federalism exposed internal tensions at the state and national levels. In Pennsylvania, Republicans began to divide...

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Chapter 5. Republican Nation: The War of 1812

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pp. 160-198

The American entry into the War of 1812 was driven by the long-term diplomatic crisis caused by the French Revolution, the rise of Napoleon, and British attempts to constrain the expanding power of the French state. But the war also demonstrated the growing power of American nationalism and its pivotal role in partisan conflict, both between...

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Chapter 6. Democracy in Crisis

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pp. 199-241

The War of 1812 not only produced the eventual national anthem of the United States, it indirectly led to the creation of one of the best-known images in American national iconography: John Trumbull’s painting of the presentation of the Declaration of Independence to the Continental Congress. Commissioned in 1817...

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Conclusion. Democracy, Race, Nation

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pp. 242-256

The relationship between democracy and slaveholder power fundamentally shaped political life in Jeffersonian America. Beginning in the 1790s, democrats in the North found multiple ways to accommodate slavery in order to justify their political alliance to the South, and those acts of accommodation constrained the universalist...

List of Abbreviations

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pp. 257-258

Notes

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pp. 259-310

Index

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pp. 311-316

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Acknowledgments

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pp. 317-319

I could not have written this book without the aid and support of many people and institutions. First and foremost, I am indebted to a number of teachers and fellow students at the University of California, Berkeley for a remarkable education...