Cover

pdf iconDownload PDF
 

Title Page, Copyright

pdf iconDownload PDF
 

Contents

pdf iconDownload PDF

p. vii

read more

Acknowledgments

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. ix-xiii

This book emerges out of a life, an upbringing, conversations, and study in the school of the Madzimbabwe everyday and the school that came. It is there that it will be celebrated or ridiculed—at the various matare where I grew up singing, listening to songs and stories, and marveling at the magical footwork of “Chapter,” the village dancing professor paChikunguru...

read more

Introduction: Cross-Cultural Encounters: Song, Power, and Being

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 1-18

Writing about her childhood in 1960s Buhera, in rural colonial Zimbabwe, Sekai Nzenza (Herald, December 11, 2012) reminisced about how, one Christmas Eve, her mother instructed her and her siblings to look out for a local Anglican priest, Baba Mutemarari. Once they spotted him coming, she instructed them to hide “everything that was unChristian...

read more

1 Missionary Witchcrafting African Being: Cultural Disarmament

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 19-55

In a paper that he read at the University College of Rhodesia and Nyasaland in 1961, W. F. Rea argued that European missionaries should be judged as individuals who obeyed Jesus’ command to set out and teach the Christian gospel to all nations, not as people whose purpose was to further any political ideology, including the imperialism of the late nineteenth...

read more

2 Purging the “Heathen” Song, Mis/Grafting the Missionary Hymn

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 56-79

I have read the missionary effort to redesign African being through schooling and the lens of the brass band. The school brass band is, however, only part of the story of the evangelical musical odyssey. The first part of this chapter explores the mission’s efforts to graft the more conventional missionary idiom, the hymn, onto the African musical psyche. The mission employed the now familiar modus operandi: assaulting the hymn’s imagined...

read more

3 “Too Many Don’ts”: Reinforcing, Disrupting the Criminalization of African Musical Cultures

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 80-111

“That night I sang and danced as I had never done before. I just let myself go and really had a wonderful time. I was surprised when it was dawn. . . . The concert had ended and we walked back home, tired, sleepy and happy.” These are the words of Stanlake Samkange (1975, 13), son of Rev. Thompson Samkange, reminiscing about his first scintillating...

read more

4 Architectures of Control: African Urban Re/Creation

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 112-130

The wisdom that Reverend Phillips cites in the epigraph above summarizes the history of colonial state and capitalist investment of money, time, and energy in African urban entertainment in white settler Southern Rhodesia and most of Southern Africa. By the 1930s, the weight of colonial expropriation and enclosure had begun to squeeze and dismember...

read more

5 The “Tribal Dance” as a Colonial Alibi: Ethnomusicology and the Tribalization of African Being

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 131-153

On April 19, 1944, the African Weekly reported the prevalence of African weekend musical drumming and dancing in open spaces in the Salisbury Location: It is interesting to visit the Native Location on Sunday afternoon. Sunday appears to have become the day of tribal activities. One finds almost every tribe busy organising itself. One hears drums beating everywhere in the Location. It is pleasing to watch these tribal dances and, no doubt, from the point of view of physical training, to those...

read more

6 Chimanjemanje: Performing and Contesting Colonial Modernity

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 154-186

Not very long ago, wrote Jean-Paul Sartre (in his preface to Fanon 1968, 7), “the Earth counted two billion inhabitants, that is, five hundred million men, and one billion five hundred million natives. The former possessed the [v]erb, the latter borrowed it.” This was the “Golden Age” of empire, which, however, “came to an end: the mouths opened, unassisted.” European...

read more

7 The Many Moods of “Skokiaan”: Criminalized Leisure, Underclass Defiance, and Self-Narration

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 187-212

In the 1940s, Zimbabwean musician August Machona Musarurwa composed and subsequently recorded a saxophone instrumental, “Skokiaan,” which quickly became an anthem in the country’s teeming “native locations,” marukesheni. Over the next two decades, dozens of western and regional musicians performed and created their own versions of the song. This...

read more

8 Usable Pasts: Crafting Madzimbabwe through Memory, Tradition, Song

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 213-238

In the book that earned him acclaim as a theorist of revolutionary self-liberation, Frantz Fanon (1967b, 45) visualized the “native” at the outbreak of the armed struggle against colonialism: At long last the native, gun in hand, stands face to face with . . . the forces of colonialism. And the youth of a colonized country, growing up in an atmosphere of shot and fire, may well make a....

read more

9 Cultures of Resistance: Genealogies of Chimurenga Song

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 239-273

Zimbabwe’s Chimurenga music has drawn much scholarly attention, partly because of the genre’s imbrication with the Second Chimurenga, the 1960s–70s liberation war that finally dislodged Rhodesian settler rule in 1980. In a book dedicated to this huge ouevre, A. J. C. Pongweni (1982) hailed Chimurenga as the “songs that won the liberation war.” What...

read more

10 Jane Lungile Ngwenya: A Transgenerational Conversation

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 274-292

Gogo (Grandmother) Jane Lungile Ngwenya’s life story and sociopolitical striving inject a vivid personal perspective into the multivalent story of African being, song, and power in colonial Zimbabwe. Ngwenya was born at the crest of the Rhodesian settler system, when the impact of missionary education and colonial policies had drastically...

read more

Epilogue: Postcolonial Legacies: Song, Power, and Knowledge Production

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 293-304

In his preface to Fanon’s influential The Wretched of the Earth (1968, 20), Jean-Paul Sartre aptly captured the psychological impact of colonialism when he wrote that the condition of the colonized is a nervous condition. Colonists sought to subjugate Africans both through their own European cultures and also through subverted African cultures...

Notes

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 305-310

Selected Bibliography and Discography

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 311-326

Index

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 327-347