Cover

pdf iconDownload PDF
 

Title page, Copyright

pdf iconDownload PDF
 

Contents

pdf iconDownload PDF
 

List of Illustrations

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. vii-viii

read more

Editors’ Introduction

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. ix-xi

Volume 9 of Histories of Anthropology Annual is the second in the series to return to the book division of University of Nebraska Press, where it began. Despite the hiatus in our previously regular schedule during the reorganization, we have returned to the annual schedule...

read more

1. The Falling-Out between Alexander Goldenweiserand Robert Lowie: Two Personalities, Two Visions of Anthropology

Sergei Kan

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 1-32

Members of the first generation of Boas’s students, Robert H. Lowie (1883– 1957) and Alexander A. Goldenweiser (1880– 1940) had a lot in common, as far as their backgrounds were concerned. Lowie was born in Vienna to a German-speaking Hungarian...

read more

2. Forms of Relatedness: Harlan Smith and the Taxonomic Method

Dorothee Schreiber

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 33-80

“My! But you can get a lot more from an Indian than by archaeological work. I never realized it so much before.” So began Harlan Smith’s first letter to Edward Sapir at the national museum in Ottawa, and the first of five summer field seasons in Bella Coola, British...

read more

3. Echoes of the Class Struggle in France: Exoticism, Religion, and Politics in Fustel de Coulanges’s The Ancient City

Robert Launay

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 81-94

Among the many factors associated with the emergence of modern anthropology in the mid–19th century, tectonic shifts in European attitudes toward the ancient world are easily overlooked. The Renaissance had elevated classical antiquity to the level of a model...

read more

4. “I Have Not Advanced a Single Theory”: Mayan Ruins, Popular Culture, and Academic Authority in 19th- Century America

Fernando Armstrong-Fumero

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 95-130

Since the 1980s, literature in American anthropology has shown how popular culture and mainstream science were complicit in perpetuating ethnocentric representations of non-Western peoples like the ancient Maya and Aztec, representations that legitimated...

read more

5. Edmund Leach and the Rise of Cultural Polyvocality: A Case Study from the Ulúa Valley, Honduras

Kathryn M. Hudson

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 131-154

This paper is situated at the core of an ongoing debate in anthropological archaeology concerning issues of identity and cultural affiliation. These topics are understandably difficult to address in studies of the past, but archaeological cultures...

read more

6. Anthropology in Cuba

Leif Korsbaek, Marcela Barrios Luna

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 155-194

The present text provides a survey of anthropology in Cuba, a purpose that right from the beginning encounters a number of obstacles and complications. It is quite evident that the discussion of a topic as vast as the history of anthropology in Cuba...

read more

7. An Unfinished Ethnography: Carl Withers’s Cuban Fieldwork and the Book That Never Was

Jorge L. Giovannetti

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 195-230

Carl Withers’s position in the history of anthropology is somehow puzzling. To begin with, he never finished his Ph.D. in anthropology at Columbia University. Yet his obituary was published in the discipline’s leading U.S. journal...

read more

8. Reading “The Redbook Columns”

Susan R . Trencher

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 231-268

This paper is part of a larger project grounded in an interest in American culture and American anthropology (the latter as a heuristic device for the former). Here I explore the columns in Redbook magazine written by Margaret Mead for the general public. An analysis...

Contributors

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 269-269