Cover

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Title Page, Copyright, Dedication

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Contents

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Acknowledgments

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pp. ix-xiv

I have incurred numerous debts of gratitude in the course of this book project.
I’d like to first express my deepest gratitude to my friends and colleagues in Tver’ – Valentina Uspenskaya, Dmitry Borodin, and other colleagues associated with the Center for Women’s History and Gender Studies at Tver’ State University, and of course the members of...

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Introduction

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pp. 1-40

We climbed out of the car a little uncertainly, stiff after the three-hour drive from Tver’. Ahead of us we could see a checkpoint with a small tent and red flags. I could make out billboards and tents dotted through the trees. This then was Seliger 2009, the high-profile federal youth educational camp that brought thousands of young people to Tver’ oblast from...

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1. Collaborative Possibilities, New Cold War Constraints: Ethnography in the Putin Era

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pp. 41-69

Flushed with success, I scuttled toward the familiar apartment. The city streets were crowded, full of shoppers on their way home at the end of the day. Young people clustered around the kiosks and benches, drinking beer and crowding the paths. As I pressed the button and waited to be buzzed in, I hoped I would not have to encounter more crowds on...

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2. Nashi in Ideology and Practice: The Social Life of Sovereign Democracy

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pp. 70-103

One frigid December morning in 2006, I struggled out of bed at 5 am to join several hundred local youth at the Tver’ railway station. I was joining a campaign organized by the pro-Kremlin youth movement Nashi (Ours). We were traveling to Moscow to meet with World War II veterans, bearing gifts and best wishes for the new...

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3. Seliger 2009: “Commodify Your Talent”

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pp. 104-140

As I prepared to return to Tver’ during the spring of 2009, I realized something was afoot. In the aftermath of the 2008 presidential election, state-run youth projects were in flux. While liberal newspapers jubilantly reported Nashi’s demise (it had ostensibly been disbanded), the media announced the launch of some new high-profile...

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4. From Komsomol’tsy-Dobrovol’tsy to Entrepreneurial Volunteers: Technologies of Kindness

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pp. 141-176

This chapter considers a theme that animated many state-run youth projects and which featured prominently at Seliger 2009: the promotion of youth voluntarism. Voluntarism was one of eight thematic sessions launched at Seliger 2009. Understanding our interest in the topic, Vitaly brought promotional materials about this session, which...

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5. “Arousing” Patriotism: Satire, Sincerity, and Geopolitical Play

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pp. 177-213

On the road to the Seliger youth camp that day in August 2009, my Russian colleagues were in high spirits. As we pulled out of the city, the jokes began. “I wonder what food they serve at Seliger,” Maria pondered, suggesting that it would have to be patriotic; perhaps they would serve food in the colors of the flag, she hypothesized, “something...

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Conclusion

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pp. 214-222

According to the Cold War binary logic that currently prevails in Western commentary about Russia, Putin-era state-run youth projects such as Nashi and Seliger 2009 mark the apotheosis of post- Bolshevik political culture. I have suggested that it is more profitable to consider them within a “broader political geography” (Gal and Kligman...

Notes

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pp. 223-238

References

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pp. 239-252

Index, About the Author

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pp. 253-262