Cover Page

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Title Page, Copyright, Dedication, Quotations

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Contents

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pp. vii-viii

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Acknowledgments

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pp. ix-x

Thanks first to my family, my parents, Roland and Elizabeth Chiasson, my brother, Mark, and my partner, Kevin Morrow, without whose love this monograph would not have been possible. I also thank my extended Macdonald and Chiasson families, ...

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1. Introduction: Where Yellow Ruled White – Harbin, 1929

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pp. 1-15

“It is little realized that in one city in the world the thing (Yellow Peril) is a fait accompli: the Oriental has ascended to the seats of power, is sitting there, and has been sitting there for some time. This city is Harbin, the only white city in the world run by yellows.” So begins an article by Olive Gilbreath, “Where Yellow Rules White,” published in the February 1929 edition of Harper’s Magazine. 1 ...

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2. Railway Frontier: North Manchuria before 1917

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pp. 16-37

It is said that the Chinese Eastern Railway (CER) concession and its hub city, Harbin, was founded in 1898. The use of the passive voice is deliberate, for the concession’s origin is a controversial and contested subject. Chinese sources written after 1949 stress the continuity of Asian settlement in the region of what was then northern Manchuria, ...

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3. The Chinese Eastern Railway: From Russian Concession to Chinese Special District

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pp. 38-55

In 1923 the newly appointed Chinese president of the Chinese Eastern Railway (CER), Wang Jingchun, met with the American consul to set out the Chinese position on Russia’s use of the 1898 contract to establish administrative and political control over the CER concession.1 ...

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4. Securing the Special District: Police, Courts, and Prisons

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pp. 56-97

“The most memorable sight in the East today is not Yokohama struggling up from the ashes or the modern stone buildings of Shanghai or Tokio. It is in North Manchuria – a Chinese policeman beating a white driver.”1 This image, more than any other, dominated Western accounts of the Special District during the 1920s. ...

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5. Experiments in Co-Administering the Chinese Eastern Railway

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pp. 98-119

In 1920, when the Chinese government and the Chinese Eastern Railway board renegotiated the terms of the company’s management, the railway was at its lowest point. The line had never turned a profit, but this fact had been obscured by Russian subsidies. These subsidies had decreased after 1905 and disappeared altogether after 1917. ...

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6. Manchurian Landlords: The Struggle over the Special District’s Land

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pp. 120-150

On 10 April 1924, Chinese farmers attacked the Chinese Eastern Railway (CER) experimental farm at Station Anda. Invading the recently built, modern dairy-processing facility that was the pride of the newly rationalized CER, Chinese farmers tore down barns, ripped up fields, and destroyed crops. ...

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7. Whose City Is This? Special District Municipal Governance

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pp. 151-183

In China the mundane subject of municipal politics was rarely conflated with flagrant displays of sexuality or concerns about foreigners’ rights. In December 1926, however, a Japanese journalist observed an incident in a park in Harbin that he felt illustrated the depths to which the Russian administration had fallen. ...

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8. Making Russians Chinese: Secondary and Post-Secondary Education

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pp. 184-208

The first book ever published on the Chinese Eastern Railway (CER) concession was an ABC primer, written in 1898 by Harbin’s first Russian primary schoolteacher for Harbin’s first school.1 This school also set an example for the Chinese on how to get ahead in the new concession by offering evening courses in the Russian language. ...

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9. Conclusion: Playing Guest and Host on the Manchurian Stage

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pp. 209-225

On the evening of 12 January 1924, the curtain rose for two keenly awaited performances in the lavishly appointed club theatre of the Chinese Eastern Railway (CER). The event was the culmination of a series of charity events for impoverished students of the Russo-Chinese Technical Institute. ...

Appendix

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pp. 226-228

Notes

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pp. 229-268

Bibliography

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pp. 269-276

Index

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pp. 277-286