Cover

pdf iconDownload PDF
 

Title Page, Copyright

pdf iconDownload PDF
 

Contents

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. ix-x

read more

Preface

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. xi-xii

In 2008, when Robert Peery King first urged me to write a book about 25th Street, the thrill of the undertaking was immediate. You cannot grow up near Ogden without absorbing the street’s legends of corruption, menace, and depravity. ...

read more

Acknowledgments

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. xiii-xiv

“Going the extra mile” doesn’t adequately describe Sarah Langsdon, associate curator in Special Collections at Weber State University’s Stewart Library, who took customer service to record levels and did everything in her power to support this project. ...

read more

1. Ogden Envy

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 1-14

During its first century, 25th Street loomed as a decadent specter in the consciousness of generations of Ogdenites. In 1911 Reverend Frederick Vining Fisher of Ogden’s First Methodist Church condemned it as “one of the most disgraceful gateways to a city on the continent.” ...

read more

2. Ogden Hosts

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 15-30

15 Like many early Utah settlements, Ogden was platted with exceptionally broad thoroughfares. As laid out by territorial Governor Brigham Young, Mayor Lorin Farr, and surveyor Henry G. Sherwood in the summer of 1851, Ogden’s streets were ninety-nine feet wide.1 ...

read more

3. Ogden Hostesses

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 31-43

Sam McMillan was tired of selling ice cream for a living. Confident that he could pluck fortunes from the hurly-burly along 5th Street, he sketched out a new and remarkably simple business plan: blackmail. He decided to set up his wife, Clara Allen, as a prostitute. ...

read more

4. Ogden Scrubbed

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 44-56

At 10:00 p.m. on August 3, 1910, Mayor William Glasmann locked his office for the night, but he had miles to go before he slept. Glasmann and four visitors from the Ogden Betterment League—Mormon apostle David O. McKay, Reverend Noble Strong Elderkin of the First Congregational Church, and businessmen Heber Scowcroft and Herbert L. Griffin— ...

read more

5. Ogden Parched

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 57-70

57 The Prohibitionists had triumphed, serenely confident that drinkers would come to love an alcohol-free utopia. The first bootlegger arrested and tried in Ogden—proprietor Frank Prouty of the Weber Hotel1—got the maximum sentence of six months in jail, and municipal judge George S. Barker warned that other scofflaws could expect the same harsh treatment.2 ...

read more

6. Ogden Follies

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 71-85

It was no accident that Harman Ward Peery’s ascension as mayor of Ogden came in the same election that scuttled Prohibition. In the depths of the Great Depression, Ogden was desperate for an antidote. Peery was well known as the developer of the Egyptian Theater and other public entertainments, ...

read more

7. Ogden Blushed

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 86-100

Of all the scarlet women to inhabit 25th Street during its third heyday, none is more enshrined in legend than Rosetta Ducinnie Davie, proprietress of the Rose Rooms from 1948 to 1950. Gifted with alluring beauty, poise, and an eye for high fashion, Rosetta was a celebrity on the street, in the courts, and in the press. ...

read more

8. Ogden Shrugged

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 101-115

One of Ogden’s most tenacious legends is that 25th Street was cleaned up in the 1950s. Tradition attributes the cleanup to Mac Wade, Weber County sheriff; Jack Card, Wade’s chief deputy; Rulon White, mayor of Ogden; and Maurice Richards, county attorney. ...

read more

9. Ogden Renaissance

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 116-130

During World War II, 25th Street’s neon-studded vibrancy had given it the ambience of New York’s Times Square. But its subsequent decrepitude evoked a much less luminous Gotham neighborhood: the Bowery. In the 1960s and ’70s, Ogden’s bourgeoisie shunned the street almost completely. ...

Appendix A: Mayor Harman Peery’s Memorandum, “Additional Police Officers,” from Minutes of the Regular Meeting of the Board of Commissioners of Ogden City, Utah, October 14, 1943

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 131-132

Appendix B: “Report on Activities of This Date by Lt. D. B. Ballantyne, Detective Ray Clawson, and Detective Arlyn Garside,” January 7, 1950

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 133-134

Appendix C: Judge John A. Hendricks’s admonition to Sheriff Mac Wade following a hearing on seized contraband in Second District Court, December 18, 1950

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 135-137

Appendix D: Sheriff Mac Wade’s prepared statement in response to Judge Hendricks, published in the Ogden Standard-Examiner, December 20, 1950.

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 138-140

Notes

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 141-182

Bibliography

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 183-194

Index

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 195-202